March 2016 Cover Story: Women in Public Service

Women answer the call for public service

Sharon A. Addison, 52, was appointed Watertown city manager in 2012 following a 27-year career with the National Security Agency, Fort George G. Meade, Md.

Sharon A. Addison, 52, was appointed Watertown city manager in 2012 following a 27-year career with the National Security Agency, Fort George G. Meade, Md.

From county and city managers to district attorneys, an assistant
attorney general, state lawmakers and the youngest woman ever
elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, north country women have blazed a progressive — and impressive — trail in public service.

By Norah Machia | Photos By Justin Sorensen

There are many women in the north country who provide invaluable leadership in the public sector as a result of their strategic skills, energy, knowledge and commitment.

But several have also made their family a top priority, and some even manage to find the time to volunteer in their communities.

Based on the numbers in the north country, it appears the practice of hiring the most qualified candidate, regardless of gender, has become more of the rule than the exception in the public sector.

Here, we profile five local women who serve in public service leadership roles.

Ruth A. Doyle

Ruth A. Doyle, 40, was appointed St. Lawrence County administrator last year, after working for the county for more than a decade, and serving as assistant administrator since 2008.

At work, she has oversight of 807 county employees in 25 departments with seven bargaining units. The other part of her job is to effectively communicate with 15 elected county legislators.

At home, she and her husband, David R. Doyle, are raising four children — Isabella, 11, Reid, 10, Kerrigan, 6, and Anderson, 3.

Mr. Doyle had been teaching third grade at Morrisville Central School, but after his wife was appointed county administrator, the couple decided to make some changes.

They moved from Lisbon to a new home in Heuvelton, where Mr. Doyle took a teaching position in the Heuvelton Central School District, the same district their children attend. The move helped them balance their new work and family commitments, Mrs. Doyle said.

“It has been a big year of change,” she said.

Mrs. Doyle was selected from a pool of 23 applicants, and her supporters noted that she had a solid grasp of county government operations due to her many years working with the county.

At the time of her appointment, Mrs. Doyle joked that her husband and children “heard a lot about Monday nights,” referring to her attendance at the county’s weekly meetings.

Mrs. Doyle, who graduated in 1997 with a degree in political science from LeMoyne College, is a native of Lisbon. She had worked in the hospital administration field before joining county government.

“I believe there are some aspects to leadership positions that are more challenging for women, but generally, I believe working in leadership positions is difficult for both genders,” she said.

Although historically, leadership roles in the public sector have often been filled by men, “recently there have been additional efforts to recognize women for their work,” Mrs. Doyle said.

“In recent years, I think the increase of women taking the initiative successfully is becoming more prevalent,” she added. “Both my predecessors were recognized for their leadership; one a man and one a woman.”

Regardless of gender, there are several skills needed for successful leadership, such as “the ability to build and maintain honest relationships, which transcends all sectors of business,” Mrs. Doyle said.

Ruth A. Doyle, 40, was appointed St. Lawrence County administrator last year, after working for the county for more than a decade, and serving as assistant administrator since 2008.

Ruth A. Doyle, 40, was appointed St. Lawrence County administrator last year, after working for the county for more than a decade, and serving as assistant administrator since 2008.

She added that “traits like humility and compassion” are also important components to public service.

Successfully managing a county government involves “the importance of recognizing how to efficiently address both the needs of staff, and the needs of the citizens of the county, which is paramount to achieving success,” she said.

It also involves working effectively with others, Mrs. Doyle said.

“The people I work with are an extremely talented group of people,” she said. “The county has seven bargaining units that are full of extraordinary staff working to serve the county every day.”

Leadership “can be gained from those we supervise as well as those we work alongside of, and if I could share the need to be open to finding aspects of leadership in unsuspecting places, that is what I would share,” she said.

Mrs. Doyle is a member of the County Administrators Association and the Canton Human Services Initiative Board of Directors.

The Ruth A. Doyle file

Professional: St. Lawrence County manager

Family: Husband, David R., teacher in the Heuvelton Central School District; four children, Isabella, 11, Reid, 10, Kerrigan, 6, and Anderson, 3.

Education: Lisbon Central School, 1993: bachelor’s degree in political science, LeMoyne College, Syracuse, 1997.

Community: Volunteers to help coach children’s sports for the town recreation departments in Lisbon and Heuvelton.

Recommended Read: “Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead,” by Sheryl Sandberg.

Sharon Addison

Sometimes Watertown City Manager Sharon A. Addison, 52, just wants to be known as “mom.”

It’s not unusual to find this single mother on the sidelines helping to coach her daughter Kiara’s sixth-grade basketball team at Immaculate Heart Central, or attending other school events for her 14-year-old daughter, Mckayla.

And if anyone asks her outside of work what she does for a living, she will often just say “I work for the city,” Ms. Addison said.

She also has a son, Brennan, 26, who lives in Maryland, where he works in a management position for The Cheesecake Factory.

As city manager, Ms. Addison oversees 18 departments and 428 full and part-time, as well as seasonal, employees. Ms. Addison accepted the position in 2012, after working in the National Security Agency, Fort George G. Meade, Md., for 27 years.

She started as a technician/analyst in the federal agency, and worked herself up to the position of division chief responsible for overseeing programs in intelligence.

Ms. Addison, who graduated with a math/computer degree, readily admits in her past career field, “It was still male-dominated.”

“But I did come across a few women leaders, so I knew it was possible,” she said. “There were so many men in that field, but the dynamic was slowly changing. I didn’t let it intimidate me.”

For example, when she worked in the federal agency’s software development program, “I could count the number of women on one hand,” Ms. Addison said.

“But I earned their respect,” she added. “They wanted to do the technical work, and not my management job.”

In her job with the NSA, Ms. Addison had the opportunity to brief “high-level representatives” in both the Senate and House Committees on Intelligence regarding personal recovery efforts and direct threat warnings to the United States and Allied Troops who were deployed.

During Operation Iraqi Freedom, the agency became involved with coordinating rescue efforts when a helicopter carrying American troops was shot down. She also worked in Europe for three years as an analyst for the agency.

“I pushed myself to change jobs every three years within the organization because I wanted to diversify and grow,” Ms. Addison said. “Each one brought a new challenge.”

But when she reached a point in her career where the next step for advancement would be to apply for an executive position, she decided to change her focus.

“It would have been too many hours, and too difficult to balance family and work at that time,” Ms. Addison said.

Ms. Addison was already familiar with the north county when she decided to apply for the city manager position.

A 1985 graduate of SUNY Potsdam, she owns property along the St. Lawrence River in Fisher’s Landing, and her sister, Laura L. Lamon, is a teacher at Guardino Elementary School in Clayton.

“I always thought I would stay with the NSA until I retired, but the doors kept opening for other opportunities,” she said.

Ms. Addison recalls driving with one of her daughters in their Severn, Md., neighborhood, when the phone rang. She pulled over to answer the call, which was from former Watertown Mayor Jeff Graham, who conducted an impromptu phone interview. When she finished, her daughter turned to her and said “Mom, you hit that one out of the park!”

She notes that her work as division chief in the NSA overseeing 12 program managers and a more than $100 million budget has some “strong parallels to where I am now.”

Being a good leader is not so much dependent on gender as it is on a person’s skills and personality, Ms. Addison said.

“A good leader must be more of an extrovert and have a passion for leading people,” she said. “It’s important to have good communication and listening skills, integrity, and be honest and truthful.”

But a good leader can never be successful alone, Ms. Addison said.

“We have a very talented group of people working for the city of Watertown,” she said. “Everyone brings a unique perspective to the table, and has a different set of skills.”

Her role is to “help remove roadblocks to empower and enable them” to carry out their job responsibilities, Ms. Addison said.

“I have always been in operations management,” she said. “That’s what drives me, the day-to-day challenge.”

Ms. Addison said she has developed a true appreciation for the north country since relocating to the area more than three years ago.

“This is a unique area,” she said. “People are very driven, passionate and dedicated. It’s also a very strong faith-based community.”

Ms. Addison serves on the board of directors for the Victims Assistance Center of Jefferson County and the North Country Family Health Center.

She is also involved with the Backpack Program at Starbuck Elementary School, which provides nutritious and easy to prepare food for low-income children to bring home for the weekend.

Organizers are hoping to expand the program to other elementary schools in the Watertown City School District, but are in need of a volunteer to coordinate that effort, she said.

The Sharon A. Addison file

Professional: Watertown city manager

Family: Mother, Joyce Addison, Scotia; children, Brennan Furrow, 26, Glen Burnie, Maryland, Mckayla Weber, 14, and Kiara Weber, 11, both of Watertown.

Education: Scotia-Glenville High School, 1981; bachelor’s degree in mathematics and computer science, SUNY Potsdam, 1985.

Community: Board Member Victims Assistance Center of Jefferson County; Board Secretary North Country Family Health Clinic; Assistant Coach Immaculate Heart Central Girls 6th grade Basketball; and assists with Watertown City School District Backpack Program

Recommended Read: “Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t” by Simon Sinek.

Elizabeth Swearingin

Elizabeth Swearingin, 57, never considered her gender would be an issue with the Lewis County Board of Legislators when she applied for the position of county manager.

Elizabeth Swearingen was appointed Lewis County manager in February 2014. She previously served as the director of business strategy and operations at CYCLE Kids, a nonprofit agency in Cambridge, Mass., dedicated to physical and mental health issues of children.

Elizabeth Swearingen was appointed Lewis County manager in February 2014. She previously served as the director of business strategy and operations at CYCLE Kids, a nonprofit agency in Cambridge, Mass., dedicated to physical and mental health issues of children.

“I happen to fit their need” for the leadership position, she said.
She was hired as county manager in February 2014, from a pool of 25 candidates.

“I don’t believe there is a gender issue involved with leadership skills as much as it is an understanding of the cultural differences, particularly between working in the public and private sectors,” said Mrs. Swearingin, a native of Brooklyn.

At the time she applied for the Lewis County Manager position, Mrs. Swearingin was working as the director of business strategy and operations at CYCLE Kids, a nonprofit agency in Cambridge, Mass., dedicated to physical and mental health issues of children.

She had been previously employed by ICF International, New York City, as a principal in the Aviation and Aerospace Consulting Division. In that position, she was responsible for business development and customer satisfaction in aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul operations.

Mrs. Swearingin had also worked for the fifth largest steel producer, U.S. Steel, as general manager, corporate supply chain-customer service in Pittsburgh, where she led North American order management and customer service. She spent 16 years with U.S. Airways as managing director of supply chain, planning and finance, and worked for two software companies in aviation and workforce management.

She and her husband, Mark, had purchased a home three years ago in Brantingham Lake. Mr. Swearingin is vice president technical operations at Atlas Air Worldwide Holdings, based in NYC.

Both had developed a strong interest in living fulltime at their home in Lewis County, and that’s what made her decide to apply for the county manager position.

Even though Mrs. Swearingin had worked as the “boss” for 30 years at her previous positions, one of the most important things she decided to do when taking over the county manager position was listen to others.

“You need to be aware of cultural norms that exist,” she said. “You need to understand the barriers to change in the public sector that are not always present in the private sector.”

When Mrs. Swearingin first took the position as Lewis County Manager, “the key was listening and learning” from others, particularly those who had been employed by the county for a long time, she said.

In her position, she reports to 10 county legislators, oversees 28 departments and more than 350 employees.

“It involves real communication and problem-solving skills,” she said. “The opinions and ideas of my staff really matter.”

“I’m not the expert in all these areas, they are the experts,” Mrs. Swearingin added. “I view my role as taking down barriers that may be preventing them from being where they need to be, and guiding them to get there.”

Her official job duties as county manager include serving as the chief budget administrator for the county and “making sure the budget is administrated properly and the government runs as efficiently and effectively as possible,” she said.

The position also involves “making sure services are being delivered to the county residents, and constantly working to improve things for them,” she said.

There were not many females who could serve as mentors in her previous profession. When she worked in the finance and operations sector of the aircraft maintenance field, it was not unusual for her to attend a meeting where she was “one woman among three hundred men,” Mrs. Swearingin said.

But there were some positive male mentors in the field, she noted.

“I had to chart that course on my own,” and one way was by reading any book she could find that was written by a successful woman who provided inspiration and insight for others, Mrs. Swearingin said.

It’s that inspiration that she has tried to pass along to younger women in an informal way, such as helping them with their resumes and interviewing skills.

“It’s really important for women like myself to help younger women see the opportunities that are available to them,” she said.

Mrs. Swearingin obtained her master’s degree in business administration from Babson College, Wellesley, Mass., and her bachelor’s degree from Tufts University, Medford, Mass.

Prior to accepting her new position in Lewis County, she had served as a member of Citizen’s for Reform of Allegheny County Government, a volunteer for the Quaker Valley Hockey Association and was a member of the Pittsburgh Women’s Shelter board. She enjoys reading, theater, canoeing and traveling.

Mrs. Swearingin has two children, George Jackson, Minneapolis; Alex Jackson, a student at Purdue University; and three stepchildren, Sara, Denver; Jason and Mark, Louisville, Ky.; and two grandchildren.

The Elizabeth Swearingin file

Professional: Lewis County manager

Family: Husband, Mark, vice president technical operations at Atlas Air Worldwide Holdings, based in NYC; two children, George Jackson, Minneapolis; Alex Jackson, a student at Purdue University; three stepchildren, Sara, Denver; Jason and Mark, Louisville, Ky.; and two grandchildren.

Education: Bachelor’s degree, Tufts University, Medford, Mass.; Master of Business Administration, Babson College, Wellesley, Mass.

Community: Previous member of the Citizen’s for Reform of Allegheny County Government, a volunteer for the Quaker Valley Hockey Association and former member of the Pittsburgh Women’s Shelter board.

Recommended Read: “George Washington,” and “John Adams,” by John McCullough; “Steve Jobs,” and “Einstein,” by Walter Issacson, and “Titan — Story of John Rockefeller” by Ron Chernow.

Deanna R. Nelson, 46, has been the assistant attorney general in charge of the Watertown regional office, which covers Jefferson, St. Lawrence and Lewis counties, since 2008.

Deanna R. Nelson, 46, has been the assistant attorney general in charge of the Watertown regional office, which covers Jefferson, St. Lawrence and Lewis counties, since 2008.

Deanna Nelson

Deanna R. Nelson, 46, has been the assistant attorney general in charge of the Watertown regional office, which covers Jefferson, St. Lawrence and Lewis counties, since 2008.

Just three years after her appointment, State Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman tapped Ms. Nelson, to also lead investigations into complaints of local governmental corruption by designating her the office’s public integrity officer, along with keeping her current title.

The Watertown office is one of the smaller regional offices, with just two attorneys and four staff positions. They offer consumer mediation services and also conduct community outreach regarding a variety of issues that affect consumers. The office is also responsible for affirmative litigation against businesses engaged in illegal or deceptive practices, oversight of charitable organizations, and responding to litigation related to multiple state facilities in the region.

“The Watertown regional office is a great place to work, and we have been involved in numerous cases, some of which are local and others which have had a national impact,” Ms. Nelson said.

Because the Watertown regional office is in close proximity to Fort Drum, there has been a great deal of work done by the office staff for service members of the 10th Mountain (Light Infantry) Division. As a result of this involvement, Ms. Nelson was also appointed as Mr. Schneiderman’s Veteran’s Affairs representative to the National Association of Attorneys General.

In 2013, she was invited to present testimony before the United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, as part of a panel addressing predatory military lending issues. Ms. Nelson later spoke on military focused consumer protection topics to the National Attorneys General Training and Research Institute, and was recognized by Mr. Schneiderman with the Louis J. Lefkowitz Award for outstanding service.

Ms. Nelson, a graduate of University at Buffalo School of Law who has practiced law since 1993, decided to move from the private to the public sector in hopes of making a greater impact.

“After many years in private practice, the ability to serve my community directly was very exciting,” she said. “These are the cases that change policies and stop bad practices, and tend to be the cases that aren’t readily available in the private sector.”

Ms. Nelson believes leaders in the public sector throughout the north country are chosen for their skills, with gender not necessarily being a consideration.

“At least during my professional years, Northern New York has been a great place for female leaders in the public sector,” she said. “During the last twenty years, our region has seen effective leadership by women in district attorney offices, county and city manager positions, elected officials and military posts.”

“The willingness to accept effective leadership irrespective of gender has been a benefit to the region,” Ms. Nelson added. “Perhaps it is the hardiness of the people who live here, but there seems to be a preference to choose a leader based upon skills over gender.”

Ms. Nelson has drawn inspiration from many others, both male and female role models, including her own mother.

“No doubt my mother’s early admonitions to work hard and do anything I set my mind to are bedrock for me,” she said. “If your mother tells you something, you listen!”

Ms. Nelson is herself a single mother to three children: Grailey, Bradley and Ella Walton.

“I have learned that being in a leadership role is more than having good ideas,” she added. “Rather it is a privilege made possible only by the efforts and skills of an excellent team.”

Every “good leader is the result of being a part of a strong team of people and helping pave the way for them to be successful,” Ms. Nelson said.

The Deanna R. Nelson file

Professional: Assistant New York State
Attorney General in Charge, Watertown Regional Office

Family: Mother Patricia F. Nelson, Rodman; three children, Grailey L., Bradley P. and Ella M. Walton, Rodman.

Education: Bloomfield Central School, 1987; bachelor’s degree, Nazareth College of Rochester, 1990; law degree, University at Buffalo School of Law, 1993.

Community: Jefferson County Bar Association; American Constitution Society; New Forest Pony Society of North America; First Presbyterian Church of Watertown.

Recommended Read: “John Adams,” by David McCullough; “The Bucolic Plague,” by Josh Kilmer-Purcell.

Leanne K. Moser, 49, is serving her third term as Lewis County District Attorney. She was first elected in 2007. She has a dual responsibility as the Lewis County Coroner. Ms. Moser sits in a courtroom at the Lewis County Courthouse with portraits of past presiding judges behind her.

Leanne K. Moser, 49, is serving her third term as Lewis County District Attorney. She was first elected in 2007. She has a dual responsibility as the Lewis County Coroner. Ms. Moser sits in a courtroom at the Lewis County Courthouse with portraits of past presiding judges behind her.

Leanne K. Moser

Leanne K. Moser, 49, is serving her third term as Lewis County District Attorney. She is overseeing one of the smallest DA’s offices in the state, with the help of just one assistant district attorney.

And she has a dual responsibility as the Lewis County Coroner. The county is one of only three statewide whose district attorneys also act as the coroner.

Prior to making the decision to first run for Lewis County District Attorney position, Ms. Moser had been working as a Monroe County assistant district attorney. She had also been a prosecutor with the state Education Department’s Office of Professional Discipline in Rochester.

She grew up in Lewis County, and is a graduate of Lowville Academy and Central School. She decided to return to her roots when the county made the District Attorney position a full-time one.

One of her proudest accomplishments in Lewis County has been starting up a victim impact program. As part of the program, those convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs hear from family members of people injured or killed by impaired drivers.

She has also worked to establish a system that prevents cases from slipping through the cracks, by practicing “communication and efficiency” with other law enforcement officials.

“I’ve had some great role models, both male and female, from law professors to other prosecutors,” Ms. Moser said. “Truth be told, it’s more personality as opposed to gender.”

But “that doesn’t mean that in some ways, it’s still a male-dominated world, although I never felt that in my career,” she said.

“There still may be some old school beliefs about a woman being in power,” Ms. Moser said. “But it is what it is.”

One of the most important traits in being a good prosecutor is that “you have to learn to overcome things, and you have to have good negotiating skills,” Ms. Moser said.

After working in a private law firm for four years, Ms. Moser decided to enter the public sector because “while I really enjoyed the people that I worked with, the private law practice was just not my calling.”

“From the beginning, I wanted to do prosecuting,” she said.

It’s a profession with mixed rewards, Ms. Moser said.

“It’s rewarding to help victims, but you can also get burnt out by the horrible things that happen to people,” she said. “It’s the parts of the job that keeps you going which can also wear you down.”

One challenge for women in the law enforcement profession is recognizing the fact that men and women are different, and will often not respond the same way to the same situation, she said.

Sometimes their behavior, however, is still interpreted based on their gender, Ms. Moser said.

“A woman being aggressive can sometimes be interpreted differently than a man being aggressive,” she said.

What has concerned her in recent years is the rise of social media, which allows for more wide open and anonymous criticism of public officials, both male and female, she said.

“I have no problem with honest debate and differences of opinion, but not personal attacks,” she said. “The age of anonymity has taken that to a whole new level, because people write what they won’t say in person.”

“You have to have thick skin, but that doesn’t mean things don’t hurt,” she added.

Ms. Moser is a member of the New York State District Attorney Association Board of Directors.

The Leanne K. Moser file

Professional: Lewis County District Attorney and Lewis County Coroner

Family: Parents, Wilbur and Sharon Moser, Castorland; two older brothers, living in Texas and Long Island; three nephews and one niece.

Education: Lowville Academy and Central School, 1985; bachelor’s degree, Syracuse University, 1988; law degree, Syracuse University Law School, 1991.

Community: Member of the Board of Directors, District Attorney Association of the State of New York.

Recommended Read: “To Kill A Mockingbird,” by Harper Lee.

Norah Machia is a freelance writer who lives in Watertown. She is a 20-year veteran journalist and former Watertown Daily Times reporter. Contact her at norahmachia@gmail.com.


 

Notable north country women in public service

The notion that women in the north country are limited by a “glass ceiling” is largely a thing of the past. In addition to the five professional women profiled in this issue, here are 11 others who represent a wide range of elected and public service at the county and state levels in Jefferson, St. Lawrence and Lewis counties. By no means is this an all-inclusive list.

Judy Drabicki

Judy Drabicki

POSITION: Regional Director, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Region 6

APPOINTED: 2007

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree, Cornell University, Ithaca; law degree, Syracuse University College of Law

 

 

Carolyn D. Fitzpatrick

Carolyn D. Fitzpatrick

POSITION: Jefferson County Board of Legislators, District 12 in the City of Watertown (also served as its first chairwoman 2011-2015)

ELECTED: 1999

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree from DeLima Dominican Sisters College, Oxford, Mich.

 

 

Joan E. McNichol

Joan E. McNichol

POSITION: Lewis County Attorney

APPOINTED: 2014

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree SUNY Stony Brook, law degree, Hofstra University School of Law

 

 

Kristyna S. Mills

Kristyna S. Mills

POSITION: Jefferson County District Attorney

ELECTED: 2015

EDUCATION: Baldwinsville High School; Ithaca College 1992; law degree, Syracuse University School of Law, 1995

 

 

Catherine J. Palermo

Catherine J. Palermo

POSITION: Watertown City Court Judge

APPOINTED: 2012 (City’s first woman
appointed to the bench)

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree, Albany Law School

 

 

Sarah Purdy

Sarah Purdy

POSITION: Ogdensburg City Manager

APPOINTED: 2015

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree in English and Classics from Smith College, master of public administration from the University of Kansas

 

 

 

Mary E. Rain

Mary E. Rain

POSITION: St. Lawrence County District Attorney

ELECTED: 2013

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree in public justice, SUNY Oswego, 1983; law degree, Penn State University’s Dickinson School of Law, 1995

 

 

Patricia A. Ritchie

Patricia A. Ritchie

POSITION: New York State Senator, R-Heuvelton

ELECTED: 2010

EDUCATION: Associate degree in social work, former Mater Dei College, Ogdensburg, 1985; bachelor’s in psychology, SUNY Potsdam, 1991

 

 

Addie J. Russell

Addie J. Russell

POSITION: New York State Assemblywoman, D-Theresa

ELECTED: 2008

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree University of Albany 2000, law degree Syracuse University College of Law, May 2003

 

 

Elise M. Stefanik

Elise M. Stefanik

POSITION: United States Representative, R-Willsboro

ELECTED: 2014 (She was the youngest woman ever to be elected to Congress at age 30.)

EDUCATION: Albany Academy for Girls; Harvard University

 

 

Peyton A. Taylor

Peyton A. Taylor

POSITION: Director, State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, Thousand Islands Regional Office

APPOINTED: 2015

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s in natural resource management from the University of Maryland, College Park; master’s degree in American history from Johns Hopkins University

 


 

Athena International Award Recipients

Since 1991, the Greater Watertown-North Country Chamber of Commerce has presented annually the Athena International Award to a deserving north country woman. The place
of work listed is at the time of the award.

1991, Rose Frattali, New York Casualty Insurance
1992, Michelle Pfaff, Community Bank, N.A.
1993, Janice Charles, North Country Children’s Clinic
1994, Chandler Ralph, Adirondack Medical Center
1995, Lana Brown-Taylor, Indian River School District
1996, Cathy Pircsuk, WWNY-TV 7/WNYF Fox 28
1997, Beth Fipps, HSBC Bank
1998, Deborah McGloine, Jefferson Community College
1999, Jayn Graves, United Way of Northern New York
2000, Maria Roche, Carthage High School
2001, Margaret “Peg” Fargo, YMCA
2002, Ruth-Ellen Blodgett, Samaritan Medical Center
2003, Pamela Caswell, Watertown Urban Mission*
2004, Jane Gendron, American Red Cross
2005, Mary Corriveau, Watertown city manager
2006, Cindy Intschert, Jefferson Co. district attorney
2007, Kate Fenlon, Jefferson Community College
2008, Donna Dutton, Watertown city clerk
2009, Jody LaLone, Car-Freshner Corp.
2010, Pamela Beyor, AIA, Bernier, Carr & Associates
2011, Lisa Weber, Timeless Frames, Expression & Décor
2012, Denise Young, Fort Drum Regional Health Planning Organization
2013, Margaret “Peggy” Coe, physicist
2014, Erika Flint, Watertown Urban Mission
2015, Carolyn Fitzpatrick, Jefferson County Board
of Legislators