Creating an Effective Team

Vega Nutting

“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I ended up where I needed to be.” – Douglas Adams

Though I never imagined I would one day be working in Health Information Technology, today I am doing just that at the Fort Drum Regional Health Planning Organization. And when I look around at the team of women that support me at FDRHPO, I am always reminded how remarkable it is that we landed here together.

     At FDRHPO, we are right in the middle of a key transformation of our region’s healthcare system, working on a daily basis to improve the quality of care for our community, support our region’s healthcare providers and fill any gaps that may exist across the healthcare spectrum. Our agency is currently – and always has been – led by a woman, and it has several women in management roles.

     My direct team, which focuses on implementing the Patient-Centered Medical Home model in primary care offices throughout the north country, is made up of five women. We work closely together to support our agency’s mission, support the entire tri-county healthcare system, support our families and anyone else whose path we might cross throughout the day. As women, it’s just what we do.

     However, what we do in a day is just part of our story. The really interesting piece involves who we are, how we ended up in this field, and why we function as a great team in the male-dominated Information Technology sector.

     So, what makes an effective team? Forbes Magazine suggests that team chemistry might be more simple than we often think – “The most engaged and excited teams in the world can be found at your local park watching a Little League baseball game.”

     Working together towards a common goal, learning from past mistakes, encouraging one another, understanding individual roles, having a confident team leader, and even a little celebratory cheering when the team scores are all attributes of highly effective team. Forbes goes on to list five specific attributes of a highly successful team. They are:

  1. Having a Clear Vision – Being motivated not only by your company’s mission, but also by your own personal mission helps each individual team member realize how her personal contributions lend to the big picture.
  2. Having an Inspiring Leader – The best teams are led by people who communicate the vision, lead humbly and are open to feedback and criticism. They encourage employee development, leave the door open and delegate effectively.
  3. Team Cooperation – Teams that know how to work together and properly divvy up tasks gain the most from their group’s unique mix of knowledge and abilities.
  4. Constructive Communication – Teams are always a work in progress. That’s why the best teams are open to feedback and actively encourage constructive communication.
  5. Appreciation All Around – Just as the whole team cheers for a home run, effective teams cheer each other on for individual victories, big or small. Regularly recognizing each other’s work lets everyone know their effort is valued.

     I believe the women and men I work with demonstrate these qualities every day. Including myself, the women I work with directly do not have backgrounds in technology. We have worked as clinical nurses, nonprofit representatives, behavioral health specialists and even foreman supervisors. As a team, we use these skills with technology to achieve our own goals and the shared goals of our healthcare partners in this region.

     To conclude with a thought from Henry Ford, “Coming together is a beginning; Keeping together is progress; Working together is success.”

     Regardless of the industry or project we are involved in, we must remember to work together and encourage all members of the team.

VEGA NUTTING is a is the Patient-Centered Medical Home Implementation Project Manager at the Fort Drum Regional Health Planning Organization.Her background in is practical nursing and health administration. She is a PCMH Certified Content Expert and is working toward her national certification in project management.