How to Find the Best Location For Your Business

Jennifer McCluskey

At the Small Business Development Center, we work with a lot of business owners who are looking to move into a downtown space and trying to decide the best town or location for their business. What some business owners don’t know is that through our Research Network we have access to many different statistical databases. We can use these databases to get our clients much of the statistical information they would need to make an informed decision about where to start their new brick-and-mortar business, or which location would be right to move or expand their business. Some of the statistics that can be vital for making this decision are as follows:

    Traffic Counts:  The state Department of Transportation keeps a website which can map down to very precise detail how many cars travel down a specific street or through an intersection so that you, as the business owner, can know how many vehicles drive past your potential location. The DOT traffic website is free for anyone to use, so this is information you can get on your own, or the SBDC can compile it for you.

    Pedestrian Counts:  Sometimes just knowing how many cars drive past a location is not enough, you may need to know how much foot traffic there is. Some of the larger cities may have this information, but in the north country business owners may need to develop their own pedestrian count study. The SBDC can help you with strategies to design an accurate pedestrian count that won’t require you to sit out there all day, and will help get a more complete representation of where people go over time.

    Demographic Data:  The SBDC Research Network has paid for access to several databases that provide a wealth of knowledge about the people that live in a particular area. Knowing the ages, income ranges, ethnicity and buying patterns of a community is vital information for local business owners. We can create a customized geography around your business or potential location, looking at a radius of less than a mile to up to 150 miles away, or we can explore the population of a town, county or state. These databases take information from the U.S. Census Bureau and private sources to examine how many households there are in the area, what income ranges are, the daytime population of workers in an area versus the night time population of residents, and also demographic information like age, ethnic background and more. These numbers can help you see if your target population is active in the downtown area you are examining. We can also show this data in map form, so you can get an idea, say, of which areas of a city contain residents who earn higher incomes.

    These tools can also provide information about consumer spending and behavior patterns in an area. If, for example, you sell a healthy snack product, the database can tell you how many people in a local area are trying to eat healthy and lose weight, and how much the average household spends on snacks. There are a wide range of expenditures and behaviors covered, including restaurant, food and beverage, household items and services, recreation and medical services.

    As your SBDC business advisor, we can also get general industry trends, to give you an idea of what to look for in your industry and how technology, marketing, and other changes may lead to a shift in how you do business as you expand.

                When you don’t know what you don’t know about expanding your business, consulting us at the SBDC can be a great option for free business counseling and access to market research.  To set up an appointment for confidential business counseling and support, you can contact the SUNY Canton SBDC at (315) 386-7312 or the Watertown SBDC at JCC (315) 782-9262.

Jennifer McCluskey is a certified business advisor with the New York State Small Business Development Center at SUNY Canton. Contact her McCluskeyj@canton.edu.