A historical St. Lawrence Seaway

Scene of an Aug. 10, 1954, groundbreaking ceremony near Cornwall, Ontario, for the St. Lawrence River hydroelectric project. (Watertown Daily Times archives)

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A River between us and the largest population in Canada

Sarah O’Connell

By Sarah O’Connell

Every spring, the Ottawa Travel and Vacation Show attracts over 17,000 people to explore destinations; St. Lawrence County was among them. Caribbean, African, Canadian, U.S. and East Asian destinations handed out brochures, provided tastings and talked with people, spreading awareness, ensuring their destination was top of mind in the traveler’s decision-making process.

    The St. Lawrence County booth included a display on the expanded Ogdensburg International Airport, which caught the eye of many. They were very interested in the low-cost direct flights, the opportunity to clear customs at the border and fly a domestic flight to their final US destination.  For many of them, Ogdensburg is closer than Ottawa, so price and convenience are selling points.  They were interested in the opportunity to spend the night before they flew, to take advantage of park- and-ride opportunities, have a nice meal and then do their shopping on their return drive.  Likewise, they were excited to hear that you can now get to Baltimore from the Massena Airport.

    It was interesting to talk to Canadians about what brings them over the border, what discourages them, and what excites them. Like many of us, Canadians are very sensitive about their dollars. Given the current value of their dollar, they still expressed their continued visits to shop for groceries, gas up their vehicles, and take advantage of discounted retail shopping and shipping! Not everything is cheaper, but some things still are.  The year-round Vermont ski area exhibiting next to us had a sign that read ‘Canadian at Par’. I asked them how maintaining that promise has impacted their business. He said that Canadian customers are too important to their company, they need to continue that loyalty and offering that commitment is the best marketing message they can send.

    Some expressed concern over discrimination at the border, while others mentioned ease. People were especially excited about golfing here, the price and ability to get tee times.  Nearly every rack card promoting cycling was taken. The wide shoulders, minimal traffic and beautiful scenery is desirable to them.  They were interested in the diversity and affordability of live entertainment offered through Ogdensburg Command Performance, the Orchestra of Northern New York, Community Performance Series at SUNY Potsdam and all of the festivals going on. They expressed that the closeness made it possible to take a drive to explore new places.  Several families were thrilled by the idea of a short drive with the kids to get away, and feel like they are ‘in a different country’. Robert Moses State Park in Massena  with the soon-to- be- open Nature Center, the Eisenhower Locks, Hawkins Point Visitors Center, campgrounds and cabins, trails and safe cycling all sounded idyllic as a summer escape from the city.

    Approximately 40 percent of Canada’s population lives within 200 miles of our border. In St. Lawrence County, we have two international bridges (Prescott-Ogdensburg and Cornwall-Massena).  What an opportunity?

May 20 Questions: Jeff Garnsey

HOLLY BONAME / NNY BUSINESS

Growing up along the St. Lawrence River, Jeff Garnsey comes from a long line of outdoor guides and navigators. Today, after 26 years of serving with the U.S. Navy, he is fufilling his dream of continuing the family tradition and is a master captain and guide operating Garnsey’s Classic Island Cruises throughout the Thousand Islands region. We spoke with Mr. Garnsey about his career path and life on the water.

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To Buy or Rent, That is the Question!

Lance Evans

A recent Watertown Daily Times article cited a study by SmartAsset comparing average rent to home prices by county nationwide.
    In New York state, Jefferson County ranked 8th in terms of being more viable to buy than rent. According to the study, the break-even point, the point when the amount paid in rent exceeds the cost of purchasing a home, is 1.4 years. For the comparison, SmartAsset used an average price of $222,146 for a Jefferson County home with an average monthly mortgage of $558 versus an average monthly rent of $1,492.

    A little lower on the list was Lewis County at 22nd with a break-even point of two years. The average home price used was $178,887 with a monthly mortgage payment of $464 and $1,066 monthly rent.

    Coming in at 33rd in the state was St. Lawrence County. Using an average home price of $138,283, a monthly mortgage payment of $346 and monthly rent of $1,105, SmartAsset estimated that the break-even point was a little over two years.

    For the analysis, SmartAsset assumed a mortgage rate of 4.5 percent, closing costs of $2,000, and a 20 percent down payment when it created the above comparisons. A higher rate, a lower down payment, etc. would change these calculations.

    A similar study, done by ATTOM Data solutions came out in January 2017 and noted that in about two-thirds of the nation’s counties, it is more affordable to buy a home than rent. ATTOM compared rents of fair market three-bedroom properties to the monthly payments on median priced homes in 540 counties. The calculations included the cost of mortgages, property taxes, and insurance. The report also noted that in about a quarter of the markets surveyed, rents are surging faster than home prices.  In fact it noted that, on average, rents for a three-bedroom property rose 4.2 percent nationwide.   

    While ATTOM did not look at St. Lawrence or Lewis counties, Jefferson County was included.   Like SmartAsset, ATTOM found that it was more affordable to buy than rent in the county. They estimate that a buyer will spend about 26.8 percent of the average wage when buying a median priced home ($129,000) in Jefferson County while it takes 44.8 percent of wages to rent a three-bedroom dwelling at a median rent of $1,492. ATTOM’s study showed that in other areas of the state, for instance many of the Hudson River Valley markets, it is less expensive to rent.

    The analysis incorporated recently released fair market rent data for 2017 from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, wage data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and public record sales deed data from RealtyTrac in counties with at least 900 home sales in 2016.

    A third analysis by realtor.com showed that in all three counties, it is less expensive to buy than rent. In fact, Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties are numbers three and four in the state with Jefferson County buyers using twenty-two percent of income while renters used thirty percent. St. Lawrence County had a narrower gap of 6 percent with a buyer needing to spend 16 percent of income to buy and 20 percent to rent. Lewis County was also less expensive to buy with a 2 percent gap.

    Clearly, it is currently less expensive to buy than to rent in our area. So what should you do? Look at your circumstances including income and debt, consider the alternatives, and if you think you might be interested in buying a property, check with a mortgage professional and an area Realtor.

    Jennifer Stevenson, licensed real estate broker and owner of Blue Heron Realty in Ogdensburg, has been nominated as 2018 secretary-treasurer of the New York State Association of Realtors (NYSAR) a not-for-profit trade organization representing more than 53,000 of New York State’s real estate professionals.

    Ms. Stevenson, a member of the St. Lawrence County Board of Realtors since 1989, has served in many capacities at the local, state, and national levels of the Realtor Association. She is a past president of the St. Lawrence County Board of Realtors and served on the Association’s board of directors for over 25 years. In addition, she has chaired several NYSAR committees, and participates in the National Association of Realtors meetings. Locally she serves on the Ogdensburg City Council, is active in Rotary, and participates on St. Lawrence County’s Fair Housing Task Force among other activities. The elections will take place on September 27 at the NYSAR Board of Directors meeting.

Farmer’s Market Season is Upon Us!

Jay Matteson

By: Jay Matteson

A true sign that Northern New York has moved away from snow season is the beginning of farmer’s markets in May. Fresh, local produce, baked goods, potted flowers and local wine are among some of the things that visitors to a market will find.  Having a great conversation with a friend, getting a bite to eat from a food vendor and sometimes enjoying musical entertainment are extras that make our local open air markets something many look forward to.

    The first market of the year to open is the big Watertown Farmer’s Market on Wednesdays, beginning May 24, in front of the Dulles State Office Building on Washington Street in Watertown. This market features almost everything you want from an outdoor market.  Local produce, eggs, meats, wine, plants, baked products, fudge, candies, honey and many other farm products are available depending upon the time of the season.  You’ll also find arts and crafts, clothing, jewelry, informational booths and many food vendors.  They commonly have musicians providing live performances during the market.  This market begins at 6:30 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. The market accepts FMNP, WIC and SNAP benefits.

    Three markets open on Friday May 26, 2017 and run on Fridays until their end date. The Carthage Farmer’s Market is held at the Farmer’s Market pavilion on Riverside Drive from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. This market accepts FMNP benefits.  The Alexandria Bay Farmer’s Market opens at 9 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. It is located in the Kinney’s Drugs parking lot. The Alexandria Bay Market does not accept any benefit programs. If you can’t make any of the daytime markets, you might want to visit the Jefferson Bulk Milk (Cheese Store) Farmer’s Market on Route 3 in Hounsfield as they start in mid-afternoon at 2:30 p.m. and end at 6 p.m. This market accepts FMNP,WIC, and SNAP benefits. Another market that runs on Fridays but doesn’t open until June 2 is the South Jeff Chamber of Commerce Farm and Artisan Market.  This is the first year for this market which will be held in the big pavilion behind the Adams Volunteer Fire Department.  The South Jeff market starts at 3 p.m. and ends at 7 p.m. allowing people to visit the market after working hours. They will not be accepting any benefit programs.

    On Thursday, June 1, the Clayton Farmer’s Market opens. Held in the Village Park, this market starts at 10 a.m. and ends at 4 p.m. They are not accepting any benefit programs. This beautiful location gives visitors a nice chance to walk around downtown Clayton and view the mighty St. Lawrence River.

    Saturdays are also a busy farmer’s market day. The earliest market opens at 9 a.m. in the pavilion at J.B. Wise Place behind Public Square in Watertown. The Saturday Farmer’s Market opens at 9 a.m. and ends at 2 p.m., beginning on June 3. This market accepts FMNP, WIC and SNAP benefits.  Starting June 17 on the Village Green in Cape Vincent, you will find the Cape Vincent Farmer’s Market. This market opens at 10 a.m. and ends at 4 p.m. They do not accept any benefit programs.

    A new farmer’s market in Jefferson County is at one of our newest farm wineries. The Busted Farmer’s Market is hosted at the Busted Grapes Winery at 19557 Ball Road, Black River. They are also the only market open on Sundays. Starting on June 18, they will open at 11 a.m. and end at 4 p.m.  They do not accept any benefit programs.  This could be a fun market to visit if you’re not doing anything on a Sunday, just don’t get busted!

    All of this information is available on the calendar of agricultural events found at www.jeffersoncountyagriculture.com. The list of markets is also available in the “Local Food Guide” published by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Jefferson County. The local food guide will be available on their website, www.ccejefferson.org/local-foods as soon as it is published.

Youth Philanthropy Council Program Successful

Rande Richardson

By: Rande Richardson

“Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all.” –Aristotle

Now in its eighth year, the Northern New York Community Foundation’s Youth Philanthropy Council program continues to thrive as more and more high school students learn about the north country’s nonprofit organizations and the way they impact the lives of us all. In addition to the way it helps engage the next generation within their communities, it also helps provide valuable insight into what way they want to make their mark and change the world. This is on top of the $20,000 in grants they will award this June.

    We also get a glimpse into the way they prioritize and make decisions. We see what resonates with them and what types of organizations they feel provide the most value, and those they don’t. Nonprofit organizations should take note as they will eventually need to effectively engage future generations to remain relevant and supported.  

    For some time, we have sought a way to begin engaging even younger students. As the end of the school year approaches, an initiative is being prepared to be launched when school resumes in September. Targeted at middle school students, this new giving challenge program will be a precursor to the current Youth Philanthropy Program and will help spark an increased awareness of, and interest in, the work of area organizations.

    The Community Foundation and Stage Notes Performance with a Purpose, who share similar objectives, will join forces for good, empowering area middle school students to identify the way they would like to see their communities enhanced. Stage Notes will dedicate $5,000 of their show proceeds this summer, combined with $5,000 from the Community Foundation. By the time we enter the season of gratitude and giving in November and December, a total of $10,000 will be awarded to area nonprofit organizations.

    Students will compete for multiple, various grant awards.  Although specific details will be forthcoming, the challenge will involve two major components. Seventh- and eighth-graders will be asked to write about what “community” means to them— their definition of community and what elements help make the place they live strong and vibrant. The students must then explain which nonprofit organizations they believe can best support their vision for their community in areas of both basic human needs and overall enhancement of quality of life. The winning students will visit the organizations, personally present their gifts and see with their own eyes how their sharing and caring makes a difference, recognizing that the generosity of others has made it possible.

    We hope this program encourages families to think about what others do to make the place they live better and the role they can play in encouraging it, today. As a society, we believe in the importance of educating the mind, and both the Community Foundation and Stage Notes want to continue to encourage fostering educating the heart.

    There is no better way to involve youth in making a difference than allowing them to be a part of the decision making process. We also reinforce that we are a community together and we need good citizens to perpetuate making that community the best it can be.

    Sure, the grants themselves will have a direct positive effect on nonprofit organizations and the work they do, but it is even more exciting to think about the long-term multiplier effect of encouraging this type of thought at a young age. We look forward to sharing the results with you.

    One way or another, our children’s vision for our community will become our vision for the community. These types of meaningful experiences will help provide inspiration throughout life and refine a more deliberate approach. We all have a responsibility to help ensure the community they inherit is one we all would wish for them so the phrase “good enough”  is never used for the place they spend their lives. We know summer vacation is just around the corner, but you can understand why we’re already excited to get back to school!

Quarter One Homes Sales Higher than Last

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY BUSINESS

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A Seaway of Economic Stimulation

JUSTIN SORENSEN / NNY BUSINESS
The 728 foot Canadian ship, Cedarglen, passes by Just Enough Room Island on its way to Silver Bay Minnesota.

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May Small Business Startup: Tactics

 

CHRISTOPHER LENNEY / NNY BUSINESS
 Kevin Daniels, owner of Tactics Live Adventure & Escape Games, stands in the Outbreak Laboratory at his new downtown business at 5 Market St. in Potsdam.

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Sailing Smoothly for 50 years: Antique Boat Museum Celebrates Birthday

JUSTIN SORENSEN / NNY BUSINESS
Rebecca Hopfinger, executive director of the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton, stands with boating relics in one of the showrooms.

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