Small Business Startup: The Mason Jar

SYDNEY SCHAEFER/NNY BUSINESS
Lynette Thayer, owner of The Mason Jar, poses for a portrait outside the store along Riverside Drive in Clayton.

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Changing Urgent Care: WellNow Urgent Care provides ease of treatment

DAYTONA NILES/NNY BUSINESS
Wellnow Urgent Care in Watertown.

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NNY Recognized for Unique Intersection of Industries

ALYSSA COUSE

The North Country was recently recognized for the unique intersection of its two largest industries: agriculture and the military. The area received the honor of being named a Great American Defense Community at the Association of Defense Communities National Conference in Washington, D.C. The award was a result of a collaboration between Cornell Cooperative Extension of Jefferson County and the Fort Drum Regional Liaison Organization to bring this effort into the spotlight, quite literally. Association of Defense Communities (ADC) Director of Communications, Grace Marvin, and her camera man, Christopher Wright of Optix Creative, traveled across the country to film a promotional video highlighting the Cornell Small Farms Program Farm Ops project and how local veterans are finding their roots in agriculture. 

    The video featured three local farmer veterans. All three had very unique backgrounds and expertise from their military experiences and all chose use these skills in their next mission: farming. 

    Lee Igo and his wife Denise had lived on several bases throughout the country and despite being from sunny Florida, decided to make the Fort Drum area their permanent home after Lee’s retirement. The Igo’s now have a poultry farm, Igo to the Farm, in Depauville, NY where they raise their beloved birds and sell their eggs to locals. Fort Drum families make the largest portion of Igo to the Farm’s market. 

    Steve Conaway and his wife purchased an old dairy farm in Alexandria Bay, NY to call home after Steve’s retirement from the Army. With countless hours of research on the wine industry, the Conaway’s decided to take a chance on viticulture in the North Country. The Thousand Islands Winery was the first of its kind in the area and now produces about 125,000 gallons of wine a year! With being located near the beautiful Thousand Islands and the international bridge to Canada, the TI Winery is no doubt a tourist destination for locals and visitors alike. 

    Cody Morse had roots in the Fort Drum area from being raised on an organic dairy farm in southern Jefferson County before entering the military. After leaving the Marines and returning home, he connected with his co-founder, then Agbotic Inc. was born. This farm is a true testament to how the entrepreneurial nature of veterans can help them thrive in agriculture. Agbotic Inc. is comprised of a series of high tech greenhouse that allow for perfect growing conditions all year round. Another unique feature is the robotic system that spans the greenhouses and acts as an all-in-one piece of farm equipment that can perform everything from data collection, irrigation, and seeding just to name a few functions. The innovation that originated in a small test greenhouse in the front of the farm property now has expanded to a multi-greenhouse facility with several patents pending. 

    “You take a soldier who is defending the nation and they transition to a career where they then are feeding the nation and in many ways there’s skills that are transferrable there.” says Kevin Jordan, Executive Director of Cornell Cooperative Extension of Jefferson County. As many farmers look to transition their farms to the next generation, it is evident that veterans are a viable demographic to help fill that void. With similar values, skillsets, and dedication to bettering the lives of others, farmers and veterans are built from similar molds. 

    Below is the link for the North Country cut of the video that premiered at the Association of Defense Communities National Conference in Washington D.C. Enjoy!  

https://vimeo.com/user13701449/r view/341709149/a87e94e886 

The Experience Economy: An opportunity for business

Brooke Rouse

Summer always brings people out; locals, snowbirds, visitors. It’s an exciting time to enjoy our great outdoors, art, culture, events and more. Some people have the gear, the know how and the ability to experience a lot of what is available, and others don’t – partially because they can’t access the opportunity. 

    You may find yourself saying, “I want to paddle that river, but I don’t have a boat, or really want to own a boat or have a place to store it. But I’d really like to go out on the Grasse River.” You may hear about the bike paths and ATV trails and say ‘Hey – I want to try that’, or attend an art festival and say, ‘Wow – I would love to try painting again, with a little instruction.’ Business is about finding solutions, the solution here is the ability to create and offer an EXPERIENCE. 

    The Experience Economy is growing by leaps and bounds, year over year, with the most significant growth in the 18-34 year old population. Still 50 percent of this audience is 45 years or older. This is an opportunity. The term Experience Economy was first introduced in 1998 as an argument that “businesses must orchestrate memorable events for their customers, and that memory itself becomes the product: the “experience” (Pine & Gilmore). 

    Online shopping has become the number one threat and concern to many retail establishments and brick and mortar businesses and attractions. Business owners are constantly seeking ways to stay competitive in the retail market, typically honing in on tremendous customer service that equates to an EXPERIENCE that cannot be found online. Organizations like the Frederic Remington Art Museum in Ogdensburg have increased their focus on experience, not only for a museum tour, but for the unique opportunity to do yoga in the gallery or learn how to paint. Increased awareness of the museum through events and experiences has ensured greater exposure in new markets and a stronger relationship with patrons. 

    St. Lawrence County has welcomed two new ‘Experience Businesses’ for recreation this year. Seaway Outfitters in Ogdensburg rents bikes, SUP boards, kayaks, rollerblades and offers ATV tours. Grasse River Adventures offers fully guided and outfitted hunting, camping, hiking and canoe trips. This type of service allows people to experience things they may not get to otherwise, reduces risk, and allows for adventure without the hassle. These experiences can be booked on the internet, but are offered and experienced here, on the ground by local businesses. 

    Experience comes from and is shared by passion. Allow yourself to pursue local experiences…if there is not a business offering it, consider creating one or recruiting a friend of family member to do it. Business development assistance is available by local Chambers and Small Business Development Centers. 

    As the Tourism Promotion Agent for St. Lawrence County, we are constantly marketing (and bragging) about our tremendous opportunities to discover things here that even locals don’t know about. We are always seeking more opportunities to refer a business to make the experience happen for visitors and residents. 

The Value of the Unrestricted (Broadly Specific) Gift

Rande Richardson

“The great use of a life is to spend it for something that outlives it.” — William James, American philosopher 

I’m often asked what I see in trends in charitable giving. It has become evident over the past decade that the interest in unrestricted giving has been trending downward. Donors have been expressing their interest in being more directed in their support of their communities. 

    When the Community Foundation was incorporated 90 years ago it was done with the premise that making communities better belongs to everyone and that a donor in 1929 could not possibly fully anticipate the needs of the community nearly a century later. Their founding gifts were made with only one restriction —geography. Because of the foresight of these donors, their support has enabled: 

    ▪ Start-up grants to help establish Hospice of Jefferson County, North Country Children’s Clinic, Watertown Teen Center, Thousand Islands Performing Arts Fund (Clayton Opera House), Volunteer Transportation Center, and the North Country Children’s Museum.  

    ▪ Transformational grants to advance the work of Watertown Family YMCA, Samaritan Medical Center, Roswell P. Flower Memorial Library, Thompson Park Conservancy, Lewis County General Hospital, Carthage Area Hospital, River Hospital, Gouverneur Hospital, Clifton-Fine Hospital, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, Thousand Islands Land Trust, Children’s Home of Jefferson County, Disabled Persons Action Organization, and Jefferson Rehabilitation Center. 

    ▪ Ongoing support of organizations such as the Orchestra of Northern New York, Jefferson Community College, Jefferson County Historical Society, Frederic Remington Art Museum, Thousand Islands Arts Center, SPCA of Jefferson County, and WPBS. Support is provided each year to food pantries, soup kitchens and school programs across the three counties. 

    Many of the grants have come at pivotal points in the evolution of these organizations when there might not have been other resources available. They would not have been possible without the trust of an unrestricted gift. They were enabled by the willingness of community-minded donors who saw an avenue to focus their generosity in the broadest way with the highest degree of impact. Unrestricted giving remains the cornerstone of the ability to respond with flexibility to emerging needs at times when they are most needed. 

    This type of giving requires a deeper level of trust between the donor and the organization. While it is easy to resist the notion of leaving a gift at the discretion of an organization’s board, unrestricted giving is critical to almost every nonprofit organization. Even if a donor is supporting a specific program, those programs cannot thrive without the underlying health and supporting structure unrestricted giving provides. Full commitment to an organization helps ensure its health so the things donors care about most can be ably implemented. 

    For those unable to overcome the thought of a totally unrestricted gift, some Community Foundation donors have taken a hybrid approach. “Broadly specific” giving has seen the number of donor-directed funds at the Foundation grow substantially. Many of these funds support certain fields-of-interest (education, health care, environment, children and youth, history, arts and culture, animal welfare). There has also been a trend toward geographic-specific giving. A donor can restrict the use of the gift to a certain city, town or village, or county. Recently, six separate charitable funds have been established at the Community Foundation to benefit St. Lawrence County, including specific provisions for Gouverneur, Canton, Massena, Potsdam and the CliftonFine region. These join other funds that focus on specific communities such as Lowville, Boonville, Constableville and Westernville, Clayton, Cape Vincent, Alexandria Bay and the Six Towns of Southern Jefferson County. Some of those geographic-specific funds also have directives within them for certain focus areas. 

    Many donors have created endowments to benefit multiple nonprofit organizations in perpetuity in the spirit of an unrestricted gift with the accountability of a directed gift. These funds also contain field of interest language in the event a specific organization ceases operation. This certainly proves the point and has helped provide middle ground. 

    Whether it is unrestricted giving or broadly specific giving there are mechanisms available to help ensure the gifts are good for both the donor and community and are enduring and relevant far into the future. 

    While causes may come and go, we need strong charitable organizations to be nimble enough to meet the changing needs of a region bolstered with undesignated gifts. They provide both the fuel for growth and the proper execution of specific programs, projects and endeavors. Knowing the variety of options to support the work of nonprofits and affect change ultimately helps ensure that whatever way you choose to see your values and interests perpetuated, there are a variety of options to better guarantee lasting energy and actions with stewardship both broadly and specifically. In this way, every gift goes further. 

20 Questions: Tug Hill Winery

DAYTONA NILES/NNY BUSINESS
Susan Maring, Tug Hill Vineyards Proprietor and President.

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From The Battle Field To The Cattle Field

CHRISTOPHER LENNEY/NNY MAGAZINES
Tucker family is he heart and soul of of the Tucker Black Angus Ranch, back, from left, Hunter, Kelly, and Justin, front from left, Addie Dayton and Carson.

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Lewis County is Dairy

 

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Small Business Startup: The Rift Thrift

SYDNEY SCHAEFER/NNY BUSINESS
Brian James, owner of The Rift Thrift stands in front of his store located in downtown Cape Vincent.

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Soy Bean Foreign Affairs: New tariffs create changes in crop production

SYDNEY SCHAEFER/NNY BUSINESS
Ronald Robbins, owner of North Harbor Dairy and Old McDonald’s Farm, observes his soybean crops in one of his soybean field located in Hounsfield.

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