Taking It To The Streets

CHRISTOPHER LENNEY / NNY BUSINESS
Even before opening her bakery in Madrid, Anastasia Cote had away wanted to have a food truck and she never let go of the dream.

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Healing Hands: Nursing degree provides economic wellness and health

SYDNEY SCHAEFER / NNY BUSINESS
Megan Finucane, left, and Katie O’Brien, right, sisters who both work in the Intensive Care Unit at Samaritan Medical Center, pose for a portrait inside an empty patient room at Samaritan. Both went through Jefferson Community College’s nursing program and O’Brien is a nursing instructor at the college.

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Questions Remain: How effective and efficient is the Excelsior Scholarship Program?

SYDNEY SCHAEFER / NNY BUSINESS
Students walk through the lobby of the Jules Center during the first day of classes at Jefferson Community College.

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Canton Engineering Degree Debuts: Mechatronics Program

CHRISTOPHER LENNEY / NNY BUSINESS
Assistant Professor J. Miles Canino, right, discusses a sensor developed by the Mechatronics program with Mechanical Engineering major Andrew Fitch.

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Thinking, Making and Igniting Inspiration

CHRISTOPHER LENNEY / NNY MAGAZINES
Managing Director of Clarkson Ignite Erin Draper checks out notes students have written on the walls of the Studio classroom.

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Giant Hogweed Warning and Signs

Giant hogweed invasive plant.

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Change Is Gonna Come

Sarah O’Connell

Wouldn’t it be nice if things always stayed the same and we old dogs didn’t have to keep learning new tricks?  But unfortunately, things don’t happen that way.  I think more often than not, changes, while hard to push through at first, end up making our lives more efficient. We’ve seen a lot of things changing the past couple of years with small businesses.  

Social Media

                Of course, we know that social media evolves almost daily.   Remember MySpace, then Facebook?  Now Instagram and Twitter are where it’s at, and although we seem to be slow adopters up here, businesses need to know how to use these platforms to keep up.  The same thing is true when developing a website.  We have to make sure it’s mobile-friendly.  I only look up a business once or twice on my phone, and if they haven’t gotten with it, I probably won’t go back.  Posted hours?  Check.  Menu if a restaurant?  Check.  Quick response to a message?  Check.

Cybersecurity   

                If you do business with the federal government, you already know that cybersecurity rules related to the Defense Acquisition Regulations System have been heavily tightened.  As for doing business with the government, just the process of registering as a federal contractor in the System for Awards Management has gotten more complex; new and existing businesses now have to send a notarized letter by snail mail(!) to the General Services Administration confirming the authorized Entity Administrator.   

Data Protection

                The new General Data Protection Regulation concerning data protection and privacy for all individuals within the European Union (EU) and the European Economic Area (EEA) is being implemented this year. It also addresses the export of personal data outside the EU and EEA areas. The GDPR aims primarily to give control to citizens and residents over their personal data and to simplify the regulatory environment for international business by unifying the regulation within the EU.  It is going to impact any U.S. company doing business with counterparts and customers in Europe.

Taxes 

                No one is exactly sure how the new Tax Cuts and Jobs Act that took effect in 2018 is going to affect individuals and small businesses, but we’re going to be finding out pretty soon.

                The main effect on small businesses, the mom and pops and DBAs, is the same one that’s going to benefit individuals in that the individual tax rates will be lower, leaving business owners presumably with more money in their pockets.  At the same time, some traditional deductions will be disallowed. 

                At the SBDC, we try to keep up with all these changes as best we can so we can give our clients the most up-to-date information as possible.  We’re currently revamping our Entrepreneurial Training courses to expand on some of these areas, particularly social media and taxes.    We rely on our guest presenters who are professionals in these fields to bring our participants timely information.  Of course, any individual business can also contact us to try to find out how they will be impacted because they may be getting conflicting answers from the internet, from friends, family and other business owners.  We can access our research network in Albany or our statewide network of advisors to assist.

                We like to say that our Entrepreneurial Training Courses help would-be and existing entrepreneurs learn the necessary steps to building and growing a stronger business. Both the seven weekly sessions of the class held on the Jefferson Community College campus or the online version are coming up in early October.  If you are interested in learning more about the courses for yourself or a family member, please give us a call or check out our website at http://watertown.nyssbdc.org.

                The New York Small Business Development Center at JCC offers free, individual, confidential counseling to new or existing business owners in Jefferson and Lewis counties.  For more information, contact 315-782-9262, sbdc@sunyjefferson.edu.   St. Lawrence County residents can contact their SBDC at SUNY Canton, 315-386-7312, sbdc@canton.edu.

Sarah O’Connell is a certified business advisor with the New York State Small Business Development Center at SUNY Jefferson Community College. She is a former small business owner and lifelong Northern New York resident. Contact her at soconnell@sunyjefferson.edu.

Making Connections: An Introverts Guide to Networking

Jessica Piatt

Many professionals find networking to be a daunting, treacherous endeavor.  It’s uncomfortable, awkward, and at times, painful. There will always be those who have a natural talent for working a room, namely extroverts who thrive in social interactions, but for others networking in a room of strangers can make one feel phony or inauthentic.

As an introvert, I find it all a little overwhelming but in the last year I have found ways to make networking not only successful ventures but enjoyable ones! Here are some ideas on how any north country professional (introvert or not) can embrace networking just as I have:

Change Your Attitude

Networking events are an opportunity for growth and discovery. Treat them that way! All too often we set ourselves up for failure by approaching networking with dread and pessimism.  Now, if you’re an introvert, you can’t simply will yourself to be extroverted. But when you shift your perspective from viewing it as a chore to seeing the near infinite possibilities, you take control of the narrative and attain the opportunities networking offers.

Be Purposeful

Now that you’ve changed your attitude, set an intention for the event.  Sure, expanding your professional network is a great start but it can be broad and a bit scary. Try simplifying your intention.  Replace “expand professional network” with “make a meaningful connection.” By clarifying your intent you’ll enable yourself to have more natural interactions with those around you. Start small, find a familiar face, perhaps someone you have met before, but only briefly, and work on further establishing your professional relationship.

Find Common Ground

Okay, so you’ve changed your attitude and you’ve set your intention for the event. Now what? Find a common interest! This tiny trick might seem simple but, trust me, it can go a long way. Think about how your interests and goals align with those of people you meet. This can help you forge meaningful connections that yield collaborative initiatives and long-lasting working relationships.  When your networking is driven with intention and forged over common interests it will feel more authentic and meaningful. Bonus, it will also make you more memorable to others in attendance!

Bring a Friend

The next time you register for an upcoming social/networking event, invite a friend to tag along. You don’t always have to go at it alone. Having a friend or coworker by your side can make large networking events less intimidating.  You might just find you have a connection in attendance worth introducing your friend to

Networking is a necessary component of success in any career. It can lead to career opportunities, a broader knowledge of your surrounding community, improve the scope for innovation, professional advancement, and so much more. When you change your perspective, begin to have purposeful interactions, find common ground with others, and use the resources already available to you, you will find networking isn’t so daunting after all. Perhaps you’ll even come to embrace it.

JESSICA PIATT is the marketing director at the Greater Watertown-North Country Chamber of Commerce. You can contact her by calling 315-788-4400 or by emailing jpiatt@watertownny.com.

20 Questions: On The Front Line of A Crisis

SYDNEY SCHAEFER / NNY BUSINESS
Anita Seefried-Brown stands outside the Alliance for Better Communities office.

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Why Homeownership Matters

Lance Evans

June was National Homeownership Month which recognizes the value of homeownership and its positive impact on families, communities and the nation’s economy.   An annual celebration, it allows a time to celebrate and promote the American Dream of homeownership and identify the many benefits of owning that roof over your head.

                “Most consumers know that homeownership is among the most sound investments an individual can make to begin building their personal wealth. However, owning a home is not just in the best interest of the homeowner. Homeownership provides social stability, builds communities and is a driving force for the national economy,” said Richard J. Wood, St. Lawrence County Board of Realtors president.

                Surveys back this up.   Recently, the National Association of Realtors released its Housing Opportunities and Market Experience (HOME) survey for the second quarter.  It showed that a high number of Americans, 75 percent, believe that now is a good time to sell a house, while 68 percent think it is a good time to buy.   The survey also found that a majority of consumers believe prices have and will continue to increase and that homeownership strengthens our nation’s communities.   In fact, two-thirds of consumers said that homeownership strengthened communities a great deal. Only 10 percent responded “not really.”

                Below are some of the benefits of reaching the American Dream:

  • Social stability: Improved educational performance, lower crime rates and improved health are a few social benefits linked to homeownership. “Homeownership allows households to accumulate wealth, which opens doors to more engagement in communities through volunteer work, involvement in social activities and electoral participation,” observed Jefferson-Lewis Board of Realtors President Vickie Staie.
  • Strong communities: Homeowners tend to stay in their homes longer than renters, dedicate more money to improve their home and are more engaged in enhancing their community. Mr. Wood added that “homeowners are often more invested in their home and their surroundings, which leads to stronger neighborhoods and communities and increased interaction between neighbors.”
  • Economic force: Being a homeowner also has a positive local and national economic impact. That is because homeownership creates jobs through remodeling, landscaping, lawn service, furniture and appliances, home improvement and real estate services. When a home is sold in the United States, the income generated from real estate-related industries is over $20,000 and additional expenditures on consumer items is about $4,500, which aids the economy.
  • Brings families together: Along with being more involved in their communities, homeowners are often active and connected to their own families. Family dinners and game nights at home could mean a more-connected, happier family.

                Ms. Staie remarked that “home is where people make memories and feel comfortable and secure.  Celebrating homeownership is an opportunity to reiterate that anyone who is able and willing to assume the responsibilities of owning a home should have the opportunity to pursue that dream and enjoy the many benefits that come along with it.”

                For more information about buying or selling a home, visit www.slcmls.com (St. Lawrence County Board of Realtors) or www.nnymls.com (Jefferson-Lewis Board of Realtors).   Both list the member Realtors in our area.


                The Jefferson-Lewis Board of Realtors recently launched a new version of its public website.   This is the first major overhaul in several years and brings new functionality to the search for a property in our area including the ability to search listings by a variety of methods including map tools, filtering by geography and features, searching by listing agent, etc.   Users can also access the websites of area school districts, read real estate news, and find many helpful links. 

                St. Lawrence County Board of Realtor members have a new tool to assist them in working with clients.   The Association recently signed on with ZipForms, a provider of digital real estate forms.   ZipForms allow agents to seamlessly integrate and manage all the documents needed for a transaction from listing to the closing.   These can be shared with clients, customers, other real estate professionals, loan officers, and attorneys.   The documents can be signed electronically, also. 

LANCE M. EVANS is the executive officer of the Jefferson-Lewis Board of Realtors and the St. Lawrence County Board of Realtors. Contact him at levans@nnymls.com. His column appears monthly in NNY Business.