November 2016 Small Business Startup

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY Business CAPTION Seth Hill, owner of Tarot Cafe, has been successful at finding a niche market that appeals to the arts community in the north country.

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY Business
Seth Hill, owner of Tarot Cafe, has been successful at finding a niche market that appeals to the arts community in the north country.

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2016 20 Under 40 award winners announced

20u40_notification_front

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20 Under 40 luncheon

This year’s 20 Under 40 class will be honored at a luncheon open to the community on Wednesday, Dec. 7, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Hilton Garden Inn, 1290 Arsenal St., Watertown. Registration and networking from 11 to 11:30 a.m. with lunch and program immediately following.

All 20 Under 40 honorees are admitted for free. All guests must pre-register by Monday, Nov. 28. Cost to attend the luncheon is $25; save $3 per ticket if payment is made at time of online registration; corporate tables of 8 and 10 are available for $225 and $275, respectively. Ruth A. Doyle, county administrator for St. Lawrence County, will deliver the keynote address.

The lunch menu includes:

  • House salad with house dressing
  • Fresh rolls and butter
  • Cranberry & walnut stuffed chicken with sage infused cream sauce
  • Green beans
  • Red-skin potatoes
  • Coffee, tea, decaf or water
  • Chocolate mousse parfait
  • The vegetarian alternative is pasta primavera with garlic cream sauce.

Need a hotel room the night before? The Hilton Garden will provide a 12 percent discount on rooms. Visit their website or call 788-1234 to make a reservation.

Please RSVP for the luncheon on or before noon Monday, Nov. 28 by filling out the form below or emailing nnybusiness@wdt.net. Cash, checks made payable to the Watertown Daily Times and provided at registration table on the day of event.

Reservations

Please complete the following form to reserve your space at the luncheon. If you are prepaying, please complete this form and complete the payment process below through Paypal.

Your name

Company name

Your email

Your phone

Reservation type

Total number to attend

Name and meal choice of each guest



Additional information (e.g., food allergies)

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(quantity selection on next page)


Northern New York’s emerging leaders: Where are they now?

December marks the sixth year that NNY Business magazine will recognize 20 emerging leaders under the age of 40 who live and work in Northern New York.

Selectees embody leadership, professionalism and community involvement. Past recipients have come from a variety of backgrounds throughout Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties, and have served as role models in their professions and active volunteers in their communities.

Since the magazine launched its 20 Under 40 program in 2011, it has honored 103 young men and women (three times a husband and wife team were selected) who were nominated by a wide range of people in the communities where they live and work.

At press time this month, the call nominations for the 20 Under 40 Class of 2016 closed with 60 nominees from nearly 100 different nominators. The level of enthusiasm and respect for the program has given it credibility and stature.

Last year, the magazine invited a representative from the region’s business community to join its 20 Under 40 selection committee. “As the program has matured, we felt it was important to gain a perspective on nominees from outside the ranks of the magazine and our company,” said Kenneth J. Eysaman, NNY Business editor.

This year’s nine-member selection committee also includes a seat held by a past 20 Under 40 recipient.

“We are pleased to have a committee that shares the same excitement for advancing the work of our quality young leaders as those who have volunteered to serve this year,” Mr. Eysaman said. “It is an unenviable task, narrowing the selection to just 20 worthy men and women.”

On Wednesday, Dec. 7, the Class of 2016 will be honored during a luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Hilton Garden Inn, Watertown. St. Lawrence County Manager Ruth A. Doyle will deliver the keynote address. More information on the luncheon, including online reservations, will soon be available on nnybizmag.com.

This month, in advance of our 6th annual NNY Business 20 Under 40 issue, we visit with seven alumni and speak with them about their career advancements and the importance of supporting young emerging leaders in the north country.


Erika F. Flint >> Class of 2011 

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY Business

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY Business

DSRIP Director, North Country Initiative

(At the time of her selection in 2011, she was executive director of the Watertown Urban Mission.)

Provide an update of what you have accomplished since your award, including information about your new position.

I went on to serve the Watertown Urban Mission until December 2015 as the Executive Director. During my tenure, I administered a $1.5 million annual budget, including federal, state, county and private funding. Our team successfully led the agency’s first ever capital campaign, raising over $2.1 million, which led to the completion of

a $1.5 million facility renovation project. A highlight was Meals on Wheels, a separate nonprofit, being merged under the Watertown Urban Mission umbrella. In addition, I was part of a team that ran seven major community programs, serving several thousand individuals in need each year. In December 2015, I joined the team at the North Country Initiative as Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment Program (DSRIP) director. My primary role is to provide oversight and coordination of the development and implementation of all projects within the DSRIP. The DSRIP brings the potential of approximately $78 million to the region over a 5-year period for the implementation of clinically driven projects across the Performing Provider System, aimed to improve quality, reduce costs, and improve the patient experience.

As a 20 Under 40 recipient, what did you appreciate most about the recognition at the time?

It was very encouraging that recognition in this community is not solely focused on a lifetime of achievement, but as an acknowledgement of someone’s potential. I was very appreciative and humbled, but mostly I viewed it as a responsibility to carry out the potential that was recognized in me. I am very aware that everything I have achieved has been thanks to a whole host of people, and I will always owe them my best. So I guess you could say that what I appreciate most about the 20 Under 40 award is the motivation it gave me to be the kind of leader who isn’t self-serving, but serving of others.

Did receiving this recognition have an impact on your career advancement?

Not only this award, but NNY Business magazine as a whole, certainly does a tremendous job highlighting the professional achievements of so many in this community. An old saying is that “it isn’t what you know, but who you know” and while it’s a balance of both, having acknowledgement for the work you are doing and the skills you possess can be very beneficial for career advancement.

Describe the importance of recognizing young leaders in the community?

Recognizing people, especially young people, can serve as a catalyst in two key ways. One is that hopefully the recognition serves as an inspiration for them to be their best. Many of us would agree that one of the best motivations is feeling appreciated, and the 20 Under 40 award goes a long way toward making someone feel appreciated by an entire community. Another value in recognizing young leaders is that the community has a chance to look around and become aware of the talent surrounding us. Sometimes when trying to fill jobs or board seats we have a limited view of who is available, but the recognition of young leaders serves as a spotlight for future potential in this community.

Does this type of recognition serve as an incentive to accomplishing your career and family goals without feeling the need to leave the area?

Yes. There comes a point in time where connections mean a lot more than a resume, and the sooner that the young people of this community feel connected and valued, the more likely that they will stay rooted and want to continue to contribute to a community they feel part of. I have been asked before what the best part of living in Watertown is and have heard responses such as Fort Drum, four seasons, and the array of beauty and enjoyment from the lakes, rivers and mountains, but I have consistently answered community. We are blessed to live in a place where we don’t only know our neighbors, but sincerely care about them, and that is something special. The fact I have felt embraced by this community has helped our family decide this is a place where we want to remain.


Michelle A. Carpenter >> Class of 2012 

STEPHEN SWOFFORD n WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES Michelle Carpenter, Foundation Director at Jefferson Research Center

STEPHEN SWOFFORD / NNY Business

Director, Jefferson Rehabilitation Center Foundation, Inc.

(At the time of her selection in 2012, she was  the director of events for the Greater Watertown-North Country Chamber of Commerce.)

Provide an update of what you have accomplished since your award, including information about your new position.

While it was difficult to leave my former position at the Greater Watertown-North Country Chamber of Commerce, making the move to the JRC Foundation was like coming home. I knew a great number of staff here already through their involvement in the Jefferson Leadership Institute program, and I have been truly blessed to get to know so many of the people that the Jefferson Rehabilitation Center supports. As the first director of the foundation, I’ve had the opportunity to utilize my knowledge and experience to provide structure for the foundation and lay the groundwork for our future growth. My responsibilities entail overseeing all of their fundraising efforts to include special events, our annual appeal campaign, and our planned giving program. In addition, we have now implemented a new employee donation campaign, through which employees can donate back to the foundation through payroll deduction. In my position, I also oversee the funding request process and assist staff with making requests to the foundation for the people that we support for items and equipment not covered by their insurance. With the help of our board of directors and staff, the newly created foundation has been successful in increasing our fundraising efforts and also our visibility in the community. We have many great plans on the horizon, and I am truly humbled to have the opportunity to be a part of such an amazing organization that is vital to the people of our community with developmental and intellectual disabilities.

As a 20 Under 40 recipient, what did you appreciate most about the recognition at the time?

At the time of my recognition, I was a single mother of three young girls trying to balance a career and caring for my children, while trying to remain involved in the community. Although I’m not one who is driven by praise, being acknowledged in this way was very meaningful to me. I was both proud and humbled to be recognized with such a great group of people and young leaders of our community.

Did receiving this recognition have an impact on your career advancement?

I believe that every position I’ve held and all of my past experiences, including the 20 under 40 recognition, have helped me to grow both personally and professionally. With every experience, there are lessons to be learned and positivity to be gained. Being a part of the 20 under 40 was a great experience, and definitely helped in growing my self-confidence.

Describe the importance of recognizing young leaders in the community?

Recognizing young leaders is important in reinforcing that it is possible to have a good work/life balance, in addition to giving back to the community. The young leaders of today will be carrying on the torch of volunteerism and community enrichment to pass on to the next generation. An acknowledgement such as 20 under 40 not only recognizes current young leaders for a “job well done,” but in turn provides the next generation of young professionals with role models to look up to and to learn from.

Does this type of recognition serve as an incentive to accomplishing your career and family goals without feeling the need to leave the area?

The Watertown area, in my opinion, has grown significantly throughout my lifetime. I myself left for several years, seeking larger opportunity for personal and professional growth in a large city. Like many young people who leave the area, I returned home realizing that I could still advance my career in this area, while being close to my family and while giving back to a community that has helped to make me the person I am today.


Jesse C.P. Roshia >> Class of 2012 

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY Business

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY Business

Manager of education services, Samaritan Health

(At the time of his selection in 2012, he was director of residential services for the Children’s Home of Jefferson County.)

Provide an update of what you have accomplished since your award, including information about your new position.

Following my award, I was promoted to director of human resources at the Children’s Home of Jefferson County. This promotion allowed me to better utilize my education and look at things from more of an organizational and operational standpoint. I was also able to obtain my Society of Human Resources Management certification as a certified professional in the Human Resources field. In August of 2016, I accepted the Manager of Education Services position with Samaritan Health, and am looking forward to starting the next journey in my career.

As a 20 Under 40 recipient, what did you appreciate most about the recognition at the time?

It’s very easy to get caught up in the day to day duties and responsibilities we have both inside and outside of the workplace. This award was nice because it was recognition from my peers and the community. It also allowed me to take a step back and pat myself on the back, recognizing that the hard work I had put in educationally and professionally was paying off.

Did receiving this recognition have an impact on your career advancement?

I no doubt believe this recognition had an impact on my career advancement. It looks excellent on your resumé, puts a spotlight on your accomplishments, and perhaps most importantly, creates a very well respected group of professionals with whom to network.

Describe the importance of recognizing young leaders in the community?

Individuals are all motivated in different ways, some intrinsically and some extrinsically. This award hits both forms of motivation. You are awarded extrinsically with gifts and plaques, but also intrinsically by being able to feel a greater sense of self-worth due to the accomplishment.

I think young people need that as they are trying to find their way in their profession.

Does this type of recognition serve as an incentive to accomplishing your career and family goals without feeling the need to leave the area?

This recognition has played a role in affording me the ability to accomplish my career and family goals in the place where I was born and raised. It was an important stepping stone to be recognized and respected locally, and while I may have had aspirations of living the big city life following college, this community and all that it offers will be where I raise my family.


Brooke E. Rouse >> Class of 2013 

JASON HUNTER / NNY Business

JASON HUNTER / NNY Business

Executive director, St. Lawrence County Chamber of Commerce

(At the time of her selection in 2013, she was a small business advisor at the Small Business Development Center at SUNY Canton.)

Provide an update of what you have accomplished since your award, including information about your new position.

In 2014, I took the job as executive director of the St. Lawrence County Chamber of Commerce, where I oversee and implement programming and administration for the 450 member chamber as well as the tourism marketing program for St. Lawrence County, in partnership with New York State’s “I LOVE NY” tourism program. The first two years of my role have included updating technology tools within the organization and for members, launching a new website, starting a monthly business webinar series and a five-week online bed and breakfast course.

As a 20 Under 40 recipient, what did you appreciate most about the recognition at the time?

As a young professional, not originally from the area, I made a point to invest my time and energy in the community and in learning new skills to develop as a leader who could make an impact in my job and the community. It was nice to be recognized for that, and it certainly helped to make people aware of who I am and have some face recognition, so that I was not a stranger as I entered meetings and events with people who have been in leadership positions for much longer than I have.

Did receiving this recognition have an impact on your career advancement?

I think it gave my background more credibility. I was asked to apply for the job, rather than seeking it out specifically. Perhaps the board and search committee saw some value in the fact that I was recognized with the award, and that a young professional with the leadership and experience was a good next step for the chamber.

Describe the importance of recognizing young leaders in the community?

Often young leaders are just doing what they love to do — getting involved in different opportunities — and they don’t realize how important it is, to them personally and professionally or to the communities and organizations they impact. This award tells them that people are watching, are noticing, and appreciate your hard work and commitment. It’s not always easy to balance personal, professional, and civic life — but the award reminds you of how important it is to stay involved.

Does this type of recognition serve as an incentive to accomplishing your career and family goals without feeling the need to leave the area?

I think the award reminds you that this is a great place to live and work. A little bit of commitment and interest in the community and your profession can go a lot further than if you are in a big city. People are looking for new energy and talents, and as a young leader, if you are honest and hard-working, it is certainly possible to be a ‘big fish in a little pond’ early in your career. That is not always possible elsewhere…you can spend your whole career climbing the ladder.


Jacob S. ‘Jake’ Johnson >> Class of 2014 

STEPHEN SWOFFORD / NNY Business

STEPHEN SWOFFORD / NNY Business

Owner, jake’s garden center and jake’s lawn care & landscaping

(At the time he was selected in 2014, he owned only Jake’s Lawn Care & Landscaping.)

Provide an update of what you have accomplished since your award, including information about your new position.

I’m blessed to have continued success in my 12th year of running Jake’s Lawn Care. This year, I expanded my business to include Jake’s Garden Center, which opened in May on Route 11 near the car dealerships, and has been an exciting new venture for me.

As a 20 Under 40 recipient, what did you appreciate most about the recognition at the time?

It was a huge honor for me to be chosen by my peers as one of NNY Business magazine’s 20 Under 40 recipients. I’m forever grateful to the community, my customers, friends and family — everyone who has supported and encouraged me through the years since I started in business.

Did receiving this recognition have an impact on your career advancement?

Receiving this award was great and helped me to get my name out around the north country.

Describe the importance of recognizing young leaders in the community?

Everybody needs some encouragement and recognition in order to succeed. To know you’re doing something right, and especially to be chosen by the members of your community, peers, makes you truly feel like a valued asset. I’m thankful to the NNY Business magazine and Watertown Daily Times for starting the 20 Under 40 award program in Northern New York. So many young professionals work very hard and deserve an opportunity to share their success stories.

Does this type of recognition serve as an incentive to accomplishing your career and family goals without feeling the need to leave the area?

I think it absolutely helps, it forms a sense of unity. Praise and recognition create an environment that is desirable to want to stay and grow in any community. Programs like 20 Under 40 are important for young people in the area to have something positive to work for.


Jennifer S. Loonan >> Class of 2015 

JUSTIN SORENSEN / NNY Business

JUSTIN SORENSEN / NNY Business

Time Warner Cable media sales manager

(At the time of her selection in 2015, she was an advertising account executive for Time Warner Cable Media.)

Provide an update of what you have accomplished since your award, including information about your new position.

It’s been a wonderful whirlwind since I received this award less than a year ago, with huge career and community growth. I was surprised with the 20 Under 40 award notification on Oct. 26, 2015. At the same time, I was deciding that I was ready to take the next step in my career with Time Warner Cable Media and applying for the sales manager position. In December, actually the same week as the 20 Under 40 award ceremony and luncheon, I was named the new sales manager, effective January 2016. I now oversee five account executives and marketing activity for more than 300 advertisers in six counties. I have also added two new board positions to my community involvement. This year has been a year of changes, learning experiences, and continually rewarding work.

As a 20 Under 40 recipient, what did you appreciate most about the recognition at the time?

Being nominated by a prominent local leader who saw how dedicated I was to my job and the community projects I was involved with. It was very flattering and truly meant a lot.

Did receiving this recognition have an impact on your career advancement?

I was already in the process of advancing my career at the time of the award; it actually had a bigger impact on my community involvement. It connected me to many more people throughout the business and nonprofit community.

Describe the importance of recognizing young leaders in the community?

Leaders naturally give everything they can to their job and their community without looking for external validation, but we are all human and of course it’s nice to receive a nod for a job well done on occasion. This award has become a famed and sought after title by young local leaders.

Does this type of recognition serve as an incentive to accomplishing your career and family goals without feeling the need to leave the area?

I had already decided that my return to the North Country was a permanent one, this is just icing on the cake and validation that home is where I belong because I can make a difference right here.


Jeffrey L. Ginger >> Class of 2015

Principal, mannsville manor elementary school

JUSTIN SORENSEN / NNY Business

JUSTIN SORENSEN / NNY Business

(At the time of his selection in 2015, he was an assistant principal at Watertown High School.)

Provide an update of what you have accomplished since your award, including information about your new position.

Since December of 2015, I have moved to a new position as principal of Mannsville Manor Elementary in the South Jefferson School District. Mannsville has 370 students and 29 teaching staff. Approximately 50 adult staff members work in the building. As building principal, it is my responsibility to oversee teacher professional practice and evaluations, student and staff safety, discipline, manage the building budget and ensure effective communication with families and the community.

As a 20 Under 40 recipient, what did you appreciate most about the recognition at the time?

I was honored to be in a class with other 20 Under 40 recipients for whom I already have personal admiration and respect. It is always nice to be recognized for the work that you do, especially when you love to do it. The 20 Under 40 class is full of successful, hard-working people, but they are also nice. We often forget to point out how important “just being nice” is. I was proud of the company. The 20 Under 40, for me, has become more about being part of a larger mission. When Brian spoke at the recognition ceremony he highlighted that point. He spoke of continuing to grow as a group. If we do that, everybody in the community wins.

Did receiving this recognition have an impact on your career advancement?

I believe I would have been looking to advance my career with or without the 20 Under 40 award. I wasn’t expecting to receive it after all. I cannot speak to whether it influenced the committee that hired me for my new position. What 20 under 40 has meant to me is a charge to give back to the community where and when I can. There are a lot of amazing people in our area, both over and under 40. I try to recognize excellence when I see it, every day. While I’m not sure I can wholly attribute career advancement to 20 Under 40, I can certainly say that I have a “care for the community advancement,” and that I try to recognize others as often as I can.

It feels good when others see our hard work and let us know.

Describe the importance of recognizing young leaders in the community?

Everyone works harder when they feel they are being watched. Recognizing hard work and talent in young leaders reminds them of the fact that other people do care about their work. The 20 Under 40 Class of 2015 included professionals from many varied career fields. By recognizing business, health care, philanthropy, public service and education, NNY Business points out to the larger community and to those who may wish to return home, that we have a thriving, growing group of young professionals in the area. It is easy to jump on the bandwagon and say that we have a “brain drain,” or there is no opportunity. It takes bravery to create opportunity and invest human capital in that pursuit. The 20 Under 40 program recognizes that bravery, and encourages it.

Does this type of recognition serve as an incentive to accomplishing your career and family goals without feeling the need to leave the area?

I love the north country. I have never wanted to be anywhere else for extended periods of time. Brenna and I are lucky that our careers of choice are readily available to us here.

What I hope this kind of recognition does for others is to show them that there are a lot of young, hard-working people living in Northern New York and that we are looking for colleagues, friends and co-workers with which to achieve goals.

I tell anyone who will listen that there is no better place to raise children and go to work every day.

To anyone reading this and thinking about coming home, I encourage them to do it. Call me if you need help unpacking the U-haul truck.

October 2016 Small Business Startup: Soirée NNY

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY Business CAPTION Sarah Compo owns and operates Sioree NNY, an event planning and day-of coordinating business.

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY Business
Sarah Compo owns and operates Sioree NNY, an event planning and day-of coordinating business.

 

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October 2016: Business Briefcase

NONPROFITS

Optometrist hosts foster family day on the river

St. Lawrence County optometrist Dr. Robert Saidel hosted nearly 140 foster children and their foster families for a day of damily fun on the St. Lawrence River Sept. 25. family-day-on-the-river

Dr. Saidel has offices in Canton and Gouverneur. The event was held in conjunction with Uncle Sam’s Boat Tours, Alexandria Bay. The children and families were treated to a “Two Nation Tour” on the boat line. Dr. Saidel also provided snacks and beverages for all attending.

The event was made possible through Ryan’s Wish Foundation, founded by Dr. Saidel’s to honor the memory of his son. According to the foundation’s website, “Ryan Saidel was only 19 years old when he lost his battle with cancer. During his five-year struggle, Ryan touched the lives of countless people. To those around him, Ryan defined the word courage, as he lived his life inspiring others to make the best of each and every day.”

The Children’s Home of Jefferson County foster care program provides temporary care for children unable to live with their birth families or guardians. It allows children who may have been abused or neglected or have behavioral challenges and special needs the opportunity to live in a family setting, attend public school and be an active member of the community. Extensive training is offered to all foster parents.

Call Kim Hierholzer, 229-3481, or email khierholzer@nnychildrenshome.com to learn more about the Children’s Home foster parenting programs.

 

SMALL BUSINESS

Longtime Massena retail store sets plan to close

After nearly 115 years serving the Massena area, Smith’s True Value Hardware will close its doors for the last time.

“We are going to keep operating this week as normal. Then next week, we are only going to be open on Thursdays and Fridays for a month, maybe a little bit longer,” said vice president Bill Hutchison. “We are just trying to sell off as much merchandise as we can.”

The reason for closing, according to Owner Bob Silmser, is simple.

“We are all retiring,” he said. “Our staff is an older staff and everybody is getting to retirement age. We have had people retire already and that is what it’s turning into.”

The hardware store has been in business in Massena since 1902. It occupied three different storefronts on Main Street before moving to its present location at 50 E. Orvis St. in 1979. Mr. Silmser, 61, who has worked at the store since he was 12, said his father and great-grandfather previously operated the store. He said the patrons have made working at the business a pleasurable experience.

“We have had lots and lots of good customers over the years. We appreciate all the good customers,” Mr. Silmser said. “We haven’t got a firm date or anything yet. Once it gets a little closer, we will be figuring out what we are going to do. It is just one of those things. When it’s time, it’s time.”

 

GOVERNMENT

Tax cap crimps Jefferson County’s 2017 budget

With public discussions on the Jefferson County budget weeks away, Board of Legislators Chairman Scott A. Gray said devising the county’s tentative 2017 budget will be tough.

“We have some challenges, there’s no question,” he said.

With the state’s 2017 property tax cap at an all-time low of 0.68, this year’s cap was 0.73 percent. First instilled in 2012, the cap limits tax levy increases to 2 percent or the rate of inflation, whichever is lower.

The low cap does not bode well for the county’s finances, as Mr. Gray said its tax revenue streams have not been able to keep pace with natural cost increases.

The Jefferson County Board of Legislators Finance Committee has passed a resolution designating the time and place for its 2017 tentative budget public hearing. The hearing will be held at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 15 in the Historic Courthouse at 195 Arsenal St.

A tentative budget will be released sometime at the end of October.

 

October 2016: People on the Move

Child psychiatrist joins Children’s Home

Dr. B. Harrison Levine, M.D.

Dr. B. Harrison Levine, M.D.

Dr. B. Harrison Levine, M.D., has joined the staff at the Children’s Home of Jefferson County. Dr. Levine is a board-certified psychiatrist specializing in the treatment of children, adolescents, teens and young adults.

Dr. Levine’s expertise is in anxiety and mood and psychotic disorders with a focus on clarifying diagnoses and treating debilitating symptoms. Most recently, Dr. Levine was in private practice in Denver, Colo. He has also served as medical director, psychiatric consultation/liaison and emergency services, Bridge Clinic, and Med/Psych Clinic — all at The Children’s Hospital, University of Colorado at Denver.

For the past five years, Dr. Levine has been selected a “Top Doc” by Denver’s 5280 Magazine. In 2010, he was honored by The Children’s Hospital, University of Colorado at Denver, for the “Development and Implementation of the Behavioral Assistance Resource Team.”

Dr. Levine is a graduate of Columbia University Medical School for International Health, Beersheva, Israel, as well as the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pa. He completed residency in general Adult psychiatry at the University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Mich., and held a child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship at New York Presbyterian Hospital of Columbia and Cornell universities, New York City.

 

New provider at Carthage Family Health Center

Kelsey Mollura

Kelsey Mollura

Kelsey Mollura, PA, has joined Carthage Area Hospital as the latest primary care provider at the Carthage Family Health Center, Carthage.

Ms. Mollura earned a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences from Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pa., and a master’s degree in physician assistant studies from Arcadia University, Glenside, Pa.

Previously, Ms. Mollura worked in an internal medicine/geriatric office in Pittsburgh and in an ENT/sleep medicine office in Greenbelt, Md.

 

 

 

Named general manager at Watertown Olive Garden

North country native Tim Yoder was recently named general manager of the Watertown Olive Garden restaurant.

Mr. Yoder began his career with Olive Garden in 2004 as a line cook in State College, Pa. During the past 12 years, he has used his industry knowledge and leadership skills to advance with the company.

Mr. Yoder will lead 80 team members as general manager of the Watertown restaurant, 20988 Salmon Run Mall Loop West.

Before he was named general manager, Mr. Yoder worked in all areas of restaurant management at the Rochester, Big Flats and Watertown Olive Garden locations.

 

Carthage Area Hospital hires physical therapist

Karlye R. Eastman

Karlye R. Eastman

Carthage Area Hospital recently welcomed physical therapist Karlye R. Eastman to its Carthage Therapy Services staff.

Ms. Eastman completed her education at Clarkson University. She earned a bachelor’s degree in 2013 and received an Innovation and entrepreneurship degree with a concentration in pre-physical therapy. She completed a doctor of physical therapy in 2016.

She is an avid reader and enjoys incorporating evidence-based practice into her daily treatment sessions. Ms. Eastman has clinical experience with workers compensation, the military population, school-based pediatrics and acute care.

 

 

Historical Society appoints new director

The Jefferson County Historical Society Board of Trustees recently appointed Jordan B. Walker as executive director.

Jordan Walker

Jordan Walker

Ms. Walker will continue the transition begun under the leadership of interim executive director Peter J. Whitmore, who served in the position since mid-July, following the resignation of former executive director Diana Page Jordan.

Ms. Walker, a 2011 St. Lawrence University graduate brings more than five years managerial and curatorial experience after serving as manager of collections, archives and exhibits for the Thousand Islands Bridge Authority, Boldt Castle, Heart Island, Alexandria Bay.

Ms. Walker holds a bachelor’s degree in history. She is also the Jefferson County Branch secretary of the American Association of University Women and a member of the EMERGE Professionals Group of Northern New York.

 

 

Antique Boat Museum names new curator

Claire Wakefield

Claire Wakefield

Claire Wakefield has been named permanent curator at the Antique Boat Museum, Clayton, a role she had filled on an interim basis since March.

As curator, she is responsible for building and guiding the course of the museum’s artifact, library and archival collections and for directing and developing content for exhibitions and public programs related to collections.

Ms. Wakefield joined the museum staff in 2010 as membership and marketing coordinator. In 2013 she became the assistant curator.

As assistant curator she worked on a variety of projects, including recent exhibitions such as the Antique Raceboat Regatta poster art installation, the history of the Matthews Boat Company, and The National Motor Boat Show. She has also led the first digitization efforts of the museum’s archives leading to the broader availability of important research materials to the general public.

“Claire brings a positive attitude and an eye for the details,” ABM Executive Director Rebecca Hopfinger said. “She will be a strong steward for the museum’s vast collection and I am proud to name her to the position of curator.”

An alumna of Juniata College, Huntingdon, Pa., with a degree in museum studies, Ms. Wakefield began her career as assistant registrar at the Juniata College Museum of Art, and also held a previous post at the Albany Institute of History and Art.  Ms. Wakefield lives in Clayton.

The Antique Boat Mueseum is open to visitors seasonally, May through October.

 

Robbins Family Grain/North Harbor Dairy names business manager

Robbins Family Grain Co. and North Harbor Dairy have hired Jennifer L. Hunter as the farm’s business manager.

Jennifer Hunter

Jennifer Hunter

In her new position, Ms. Hunter will be responsible for monitoring financial details of the businesses, acting as a business advisor, providing consultation to the dairy and assisting with labor management.

Ms. Hunter was most recently assistant branch manager of Farm Credit East’s Potsdam office. She was with Farm Credit for four years. She previously served as a dairy specialist with Cargill Animal Nutrition.

“I’m excited for this new opportunity where I can put my passion for agriculture and my experience in business and finance to work,” Ms. Hunter said.

“The Robbins family has built a successful, innovative business over the years,
and I’m looking forward to helping their operations continue to prosper into the future.”

Ms. Hunter holds an associate degree from SUNY Cobleskill in animal science, a bachelor’s from SUNY Cobleskill in agriculture business and a master of agricultural education from SUNY Oswego.

Director Denise K. Young leaves FDRHPO for Watertown Family YMCA

JUSTIN SORENSEN n WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES Denise Young, Fort Drum Regional Health Planning Organization, speaks during a press conference Wednesday on the Samritan Medical Center helipad, at the top level of the SMC parkins garage.

JUSTIN SORENSEN n WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES
Denise Young, Fort Drum Regional Health Planning Organization, speaks during a press conference Wednesday on the Samaritan Medical Center helipad, at the top level of the SMC parkins garage.

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September 2016: Small Business Startup

Maple Rock Bed & Breakfast

JASON HUNTER n WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES Audrey Roberts sits in the living room of her bed and breakfast, Maple Rock B&B, at 719 Old Potsdam Parishville Road in Potsdam on Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016.

JASON HUNTER n WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES
Audrey Roberts sits in the living room of her bed and breakfast, Maple Rock B&B, at 719 Old Potsdam Parishville Road in Potsdam on Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016.

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20 Questions: Riding a high note

Michael ‘Scruffy’ Scriminger, left, percussionist for the Waydown Wailers, and David ‘Dave’ Parker, lead vocalist, songwriter and guitarist, talk about the band’s growing success last month in Canton.

Michael ‘Scruffy’ Scriminger, left, percussionist for the Waydown Wailers, and David ‘Dave’ Parker, lead vocalist, songwriter and guitarist, talk about the band’s growing success last month in Canton.

Waydown Wailers meld genres, chart a new course in music industry

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