August 2015 Business History: Dr. Samuel Guthrie

A medical pioneer

Dr. Samuel Guthrie, a surgeon during the War of 1812, discovered chloroform, a popular 19th century anesthetic, in 1831. His house is pictured at left and below, a portrait of the doctor. Photo from Watertown Daily Times archives.

Dr. Samuel Guthrie, a surgeon during the War of 1812, discovered chloroform, a popular 19th century anesthetic, in 1831. His house is pictured at left and below, a portrait of the doctor. Photo from Watertown Daily Times archives.

Sackets’ Dr. Samuel Guthrie discovered chloroform

By Lenka Walldroff, NNY Business

Maybe it’s something in the water? That’s one possible explanation for the long list of entrepreneurs and inventors who have called Jefferson County home. Safety pins, bed springs, tile drains, the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (better known as the S.P.C.A.), and the concept of the five and dime were all invented or created within Jefferson County’s borders. Tyler Coverlets are native to the county as are percussion caps and a mechanism for their ignition which made flintlock muskets obsolete. But perhaps one of the best known inventions is that of chloroform. [Read more…]

July 2015 Business History: Aviation

Region takes to skies

Capt. Frank Burnside, far right, was the first to successfully pilot an airplane in Northern New York. His flights occurred at the Jefferson County Fair in September 1913. A crowd of more than 3,000 witnessed  as Capt. Burnside and his Thomas airplane took off from the exhibition field, soared to a cruising altitude of 2,000 feet, and reached an astounding 50 mph, before safely landing on the makeshift airstrip. Photo Courtesy earlyaviators.com.

Capt. Frank Burnside, far right, was the first to successfully pilot an airplane in Northern New York. His flights occurred at the Jefferson County Fair in September 1913. A crowd of more than 3,000 witnessed as Capt. Burnside and his Thomas airplane took off from the exhibition field, soared to a cruising altitude of 2,000 feet, and reached an astounding 50 mph, before safely landing on the makeshift airstrip. Photo Courtesy earlyaviators.com.

Aviation opens doors for business, community

By Lenka Walldroff, NNY Business [Read more…]

June 2015 Business History: Cox Building

Rising from the ashes

The ‘false facade’ of the historic, fire-gutted Cox building in Potsdam was ripped off the week of July 7, 1981, exposiong the first floor to passersby. Work crews, headed by Lawrence J. Hazen, owner, and Michael Walsh, began restoring the building, built in 1888. It housed the J. McCarthy Department Store, then the Lewis Shops and the Hi-Fi Shop before it was gutted by Fire in August of 1980. Photo from Watertown Daily Times Archives.

The ‘false facade’ of the historic, fire-gutted Cox building in Potsdam was ripped off the week of July 7, 1981, exposiong the first floor to passersby. Work crews, headed by Lawrence J. Hazen, owner, and Michael Walsh, began restoring the building, built in 1888. It housed the J. McCarthy Department Store, then the Lewis Shops and the Hi-Fi Shop before it was gutted by Fire in August of 1980. Photo from Watertown Daily Times Archives.

Home to Maxfield’s, Potsdam Building was once nearly razed

By Lorna Oppedisano, NNY Business

Potsdam’s Cox Building is now a staple in the town’s business district, but its very existence was once on the brink of destruction. [Read more…]

May 2015 Business History: Graphic Controls

Recording a legacy

Graphic Controls Corp’s Recording Chart Division in Clayton. The firm was once a major employer in the St. Lawrence River village. Photo from Watertown Daily Times Archives.

Graphic Controls Corp’s Recording Chart Division in Clayton. The firm was once a major employer in the St. Lawrence River village. Photo from Watertown Daily Times Archives.

Graphic Controls provided ‘consistent’ jobs for Clayton

By Lorna Oppedisano, NNY Business

When one thinks of Clayton, “waterfront destination” typically comes to mind. But within the past century, the riverfront village was home to Graphic Controls, a Buffalo-headquartered manufacturing plant that produced recording charts for industrial and medical applications. In its day, the firm was one one of Clayton’s largest employers. [Read more…]

April 2015 Business History: F.X. Baumert and Co.

A family dairy dynasty

Above, the F.X. Baumert and Co. cheese factory and  office, Antwerp. At the turn of the 20th century the factory was the largest of its kind in the country. Photo from Watertown Daily Times archives.

Above, the F.X. Baumert and Co. cheese factory and office, Antwerp. At the turn of the 20th century the factory was the largest of its kind in the country. Photo from Watertown Daily Times archives.

F.X.Baumert and Co. introduced Muenster cheese to the U.S.

By Lenka Walldroff, NNY Business

From the mid-19th century until about 1930, Jefferson County reigned as the “Cheese Capital of the World.” In fact, at the time, more cheese was bought and sold on the Watertown Cheese Exchange than anywhere else in the world. Jefferson County’s cheese notoriety came from humble origins, however, with the first dairy farm opening in Rutland in 1834 with 20 cows. As road conditions were often poor, or roads were non-existent, travel took significantly longer in previous centuries than it does today. In pre-refrigeration times, this proved problematic for farmers trading in perishable goods like milk. [Read more…]

March 2015 Business History: Clickner Mattress Co.

A Family Tradition

Courtesy Ogdensburg City Historian

Courtesy Ogdensburg City Historian

Three generations led Ogdensburg’s Clickner Mattress Co.

By Lorna Oppedisano, NNY Business

The summer of 1994 saw Clickner Mattress Co. — one of Ogdenburg’s oldest family businesses — close its doors for the last time when third generation co-owners Deborah and Philip Clickner decided to shutter the 70-year-old furniture and appliance retail outlet in search of warmer climate. [Read more…]

February 2015 Business History: Hotel Davenport

A community icon

A postcard shows the Hotel Davenport in Copenhagen in its heyday during the mid-to late 20th century.

A postcard shows the Hotel Davenport in Copenhagen in its heyday during the mid-to late 20th century.

Hotel Davenport played role in shaping Copenhagen

[Read more…]

E.H. Thompson Co., a ‘landmark’ store – January 2015 Business History

The staff of E.H. Thompson Store, Watertown, is ready to wait on customers during "Ketchup Week" in 1917. Each week, Thompson's featured one item to entice customers to shop. The previous week, the store had "magnificent oranges on sale for 25 cents." || Photo from "Images of America: Watertown" by Donna M. Dutton

The staff of E.H. Thompson Store, Watertown, is ready to wait on customers during “Ketchup Week” in 1917. Each week, Thompson’s featured one item to entice customers to shop. The previous week, the store had “magnificent oranges on sale for 25 cents.” || Photo from “Images of America: Watertown” by Donna M. Dutton

If Edward Hulbert Thompson had possessed better eyesight, the history of the grocery industry in Watertown would have been a completely different landscape.

Mr. Thompson, the founder of E. H. Thompson & Company, moved to Watertown in 1859 at the age of 23, after he had to abandon his first passion of portrait painting due to “defective eyesight,” according to a Watertown Daily Times article from February 1919. Once he got settled in the city, he entered into a partnership with J. B. Tyler that lasted seven years. Mr. Thompson had barely any money of his own to invest, starting into business with Mr. Tyler with only $1,200 of borrowed capital.

The partnership opened for business in October 1859, with Mr. Tyler’s feed business on one side of the building at 59 Washington Hall building, and Mr. Thompson’s grocery on the other, according to a Watertown Daily Times article from 1943. The original name of Mr. Thompson’s store was ‘The Sign of the Live Yankee,’ and his company became known as E. H. Thompson & Company.

During the initial years, the company did large wholesale and retail business in maple sugar and syrup, along with the regular line of groceries, shipping to nearly every state in the nation, according to a Watertown Daily Times article from December 1919.

In 1866, Mr. Thompson purchased his partner’s interest and Mr. Tyler retired. Mr. Thompson then ran the company on his own until 1892, when he began a partnership with two of his clerks, J. W. Van Camp and L. J. McDonald.

This marked the expansion of the company was well. As reported in a Times article from that year, the company bought the store of Charles A. Hungerford. E. H. Thompson & Company then moved their store into Mr. Hungerford’s old space, using the adjoining store as well, which had previously been Charles E. Palmiter’s jewelry store. Mr. Palmiter then moved to E. H. Thompson & Company’s previous location. The exact addresses of these stores are not listed. According to the article, this arrangement was carried out mostly by Messrs. Van Camp and McDonald, as Mr. Thompson had been confined to his home by illness.

In 1898, Mr. Thompson sold his interest to his partners and retired from active business.

The two partners ran the business together until May of 1901, when it was announced Mr. Van Camp would retire after nearly a quarter century in the grocery business. It was reported by the Times that Mr. McDonald consented to the dissolution of the firm and became the sole proprietor.

The company switched hands again in 1908, this time back to Mr. Van Camp. After the death of Mr. McDonald, Mr. Van Camp came back to the business, this time taking sole control of the company. He later added his sons, Charles and Edward, into his partnership.

In 1913, the store moved to 200-202 Franklin St. in the Solar building to make way for the Y.M.C.A. building in Washington Hall.

The original owner, Mr. Thompson, passed away in February 1919, and the name of the company was changed to E. H. Thompson Company. According to the Times obituary honoring his life, he was “one of the pioneer grocery merchants.” After he had retired, he continued to live at his home on Winthrop Street, and brought his focus back to portrait painting. He left no immediate relatives after his death. When the Times article was published in 1919, the staff of E.H. Thompson Company was comprised of large corps of clerks and up until shortly before that time, the company was known for having one of the largest delivery organizations in Northern New York.

The eventual demise of E. H. Thompson Company came in late 1943, when Charles Van Camp was president. At this time, the store employed six people, a small number compared to the upwards of 14 people the company had employed in the past. A Watertown Daily Times piece from December of that year reported that Mr. Van Camp announced the closing was due to war conditions. The article reads that “among its problems have been the inability to purchase stock and to make deliveries, a policy of long-standing.” The store – named by the Times as “a landmark … [which] has written a long and valuable interesting chapter in the business life of the community” – had been open in one form or another for over 84 years.

 

By Lorna Oppedisano, NNY Magazines staff writer

Business History: Braman Manufacturing Co., A sweeping success

A look at the property of Braman’s Manufacturing Company, Carthage in early fall, 1966. Watertown Daily Times Archives

A look at the property of Braman’s Manufacturing Company, Carthage in early fall, 1966. Watertown Daily Times Archives

A sweeping success: Braman Manufacturing Co. employed dozens at its peak

One of the largest wood turning and lumber mills found in Northern New York in the early 1920s was the Braman Manufacturing Company, which operated in Carthage. [Read more…]

Bye-bye buggy

Auto killed the carriage industry at turn of 20th century [Read more…]