November Real Estate Roundup: A century of the Realtor trademark

Lance Evans

Lance Evans

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the adoption of the term “Realtor” by the National Association of Realtors. It was trademarked in 1916 to identify members of the association, a revolutionary group of individuals deeply committed to integrity, community and protecting the American dream of home ownership.

The terms “Realtor” and “Realtors” are trademarks that, along with the Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice, which celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2013, set members apart from other real estate licensees. Realtors subscribe to NAR’s strict ethics code as a condition of membership.

The term Realtor is not a generic term. It is not synonymous with “real estate agent.” There are more than 1.84 million active licensed real estate professionals in the U.S. with 1.1 million of them as members of NAR. Realtors work in residential and commercial real estate as brokers, salespeople, property managers, appraisers, counselors and others engaged in all aspects of the real estate industry.

Realtors have access to advanced educational opportunities and training in residential and commercial real estate specialties. Members are industry innovators. They’re on the cutting edge of technology to better serve consumers, and they have helped bring real estate technologies into the home-buying and selling process to facilitate and streamline today’s real estate transactions.

The more than 500 brokers, appraisers and salespeople who are members of the Jefferson-Lewis Board of Realtors and the St. Lawrence County Board of Realtors are members of NAR as part of their membership. Remember, not everyone who sells or appraises real estate is a Realtor, only those who are members of NAR can claim that distinction.


The Tri-County (NY) Women’s Council of Realtors chapter held its sixth annual Jefferson-Lewis “Top Producer” event sponsored by Carthage Federal Savings and Loan, Community Bank, N.A., Gouverneur Savings and Loan, Homestead Funding, Key Bank, the Jefferson-Lewis Board of Realtors and Northern Credit Union on Oct. 20. Members were honored in sales and rental categories based on the number of units sold or rented between Oct. 1, 2015, and Sept. 30, 2016.

The chapter honored Rob Moyer as the Realtor who sold the most units and Rhonda Rogers as the Realtor who was the top rental agent.

The rest of the Realtors in terms of units sold, alphabetically, were: Britton Abbey, Roger Abbey, Mary Adair, Lois Aubin, Joy Baker, Marcia Brooks, Sara Bulger, Vicki Bulger, Patricia Calhoun, Walter Christensen, Libby Churchill, Kathy Cook, Katherine Couch, Melanie Curley, Linda Donaldson, Carole Dunbar, Randy Durham, William Elliott, Kenneth Erb, Cathy Fiacco-Garlock, Jennifer Flynn, Matthew Garlock, Joan Gerni-LaLone, Lori Gervera, Marsha Gibbons, Janet Handschuh, Les Henry, Jeffery Jones, Amy Kenney, Suzanne Krouse, Barry Kukowski, Jacqueline Ladue, Lisa L’Huillier, Donna Loucks, Lisa Lowe, Brenda Malone, Amanda Mattimore, Erin Meyer, Amanda Miller, Elizabeth Miller, Gail Miller, Gwyn Monnat, Cynthia Moyer, Bambi Norman, Timothy Nortz, Lorie O’Brien, Doris Olin, Deborah Peebles, Karen Peebles, Lori Porter, Jeff Powell, Tammy Queior, Maxine Quigg, Desiree Roberts, GaylaRoggie, Nancy Rome, Jill Rosette, Jason Smith, Vickie Staie, Nicholas Sterling, John Stevens, Barry Stewart, Nancy Storino-Farney, Bernard Sturr, and Jennifer Waite.

In addition to Ms. Rogers, the top Realtors for rentals, alphabetically, were: Clifford Bennett III, Daniel Conlin, James Conlin, Sonia Conlin, Carolyn Gaebel, Joan Gerni-LaLone, Daniel Gibeau, Michael Hall, Nicole Lajoie, Micah Matteson, Sandra Rowland, and Lisa Spear Woodward.

 


Nina Amadon, New York State Women’s Council of Realtors governor, and Lisa L’Huillier, state president, installed the 2017 Tri-County (NY) Women’s Council of Realtors chapter officers during the Top Producer event. Leadership includes Carolyn Gaebel, Bridgeview Real Estate, president; Alfred Netto, Weichert Realtors Thousand Islands Realty, president-elect; Wendy-Jane Smith, Cross Keys Real Estate, vice president of membership; Jumana McManus, Hunt Real Estate ERA, secretary; Lance Evans, Board of Realtors, treasurer.

Costlier home sales fuel Q3 prices

STEPHEN SWOFFORD n WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES The house at 207 Elm Street sold above median price for the area. Incentives driven by economic development and home buyers purchasing more expensive homes increased the number of homes sold in Jefferson County and the median price in both Jefferson and St. Lawrence County last quarter.(Wolf story)

STEPHEN SWOFFORD n WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES
The house at 207 Elm Street sold above median price for the area. Incentives driven by economic development and home buyers purchasing more expensive homes increased the number of homes sold in Jefferson County and the median price in both Jefferson and St. Lawrence County last quarter.(Wolf story)

[Read more…]

Jefferson, St. Lawrence median home prices up last quarter, but sales figures down in Lewis County

STEPHEN SWOFFORD n WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES The house at 215 Butterfield Avenue sold above median price for the area. Incentives driven by economic development and home buyers purchasing more expensive homes increased the number of homes sold in Jefferson County and the median price in both Jefferson and St. Lawrence County last quarter.(Wolf story)

STEPHEN SWOFFORD n WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES
The house at 215 Butterfield Avenue sold above median price for the area. Incentives driven by economic development and home buyers purchasing more expensive homes increased the number of homes sold in Jefferson County and the median price in both Jefferson and St. Lawrence County last quarter.(Wolf story)

By MARCUS WOLF
MWOLF@WDT.NET

Incentives driven by economic development and home buyers purchasing more expensive homes increased the number of homes sold in Jefferson County and the median price in both Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties in the third quarter of the year, but a loss of employment opportunities in Lewis County decreased the median price and kept the number of houses sold relatively flat.

The number of houses sold in Jefferson County increased last quarter by 80 units, or 33 percent, from 246 to 326, according to the Jefferson-Lewis Board of Realtors. The median home price in Jefferson County also increased by $2,875, or 1.9 percent, from $148,625 to $151,500, and the median number of days on the market for a house increased by 30 days, or 49.2 percent, from 61 to 91.

Randy T. Raso, president of the Jefferson-Lewis Board of Realtors, said the proposed missile defense site at Fort Drum encouraged more prospective home buyers to purchase homes in the area, driving up home sales last quarter.

“A lot of folks hear things like that and their first thought is, ‘Should I invest in this area?’” Mr. Raso said. “I have worked with people overseas … who are interested in investing in the area.”

Foreclosed properties that investors purchased earlier this year were put back on the market and sold at higher prices, Mr. Raso said, raising both the number of units sold and the median price. For instance, a developer would renovate a house valued at $100,000 at the time of purchase and resell it for $30,000 to $40,000 more.

“They are buying them up as a deal and are fixing them to make more of a profit,” he said. “So that raised the median price. Not only does that help the city and the area, but it also increases the value of the home.”

Lance M. Evans, executive officer of both the Jefferson-Lewis and St. Lawrence boards, said that brokers sold more single-family, year-around homes at higher prices and waterfront summer cottages last quarter. For example, one Realtor, Mr. Evans said, sold a $999,999 cottage in Henderson.

“The bottom line is that in the north country real estate market … homes are still priced nicely and interest rates are still low,” he said.

STEPHEN SWOFFORD n WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES The house at 1028 Holcomb Street sold above median price for the area. Incentives driven by economic development and home buyers purchasing more expensive homes increased the number of homes sold in Jefferson County and the median price in both Jefferson and St. Lawrence County last quarter.(Wolf story)

STEPHEN SWOFFORD n WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES
The house at 1028 Holcomb Street sold above median price for the area. Incentives driven by economic development and home buyers purchasing more expensive homes increased the number of homes sold in Jefferson County and the median price in both Jefferson and St. Lawrence County last quarter.(Wolf story)

Compared with 2015, home sales from January to September this year increased in Jefferson County by 96 units, or 15.7 percent, from 611 to 707. The median price for homes for the nine-month period in Jefferson County, however, decreased by $27,700, or 18 percent, from $154,000 to $126,300. The median number of days on the market is also up from 2015 by 16 days, or 21 percent, from 77 to 93.

Mr. Raso said investors were less likely to purchase properties in the city of Watertown while the City Council discussed Councilman Stephen A. Jennings’s proposed rental registration and inspection law. Under its initial version proposed in August, the law would have required landlords, including ones who operated outside of Jefferson County, to register all of their properties with the city and have them inspected once every three years.

“Investors felt like they were being penalized for a few people who did not take care of their properties in the area,” Mr. Raso said. “It put a lot of folks on hold.”

In St. Lawrence County, the number of units sold last quarter decreased from the same time in 2015 by 25 units, or 11.7 percent, from 214 to 189, according to the St. Lawrence County Board of Realtors. The median price, however, increased by $12,880, or 14.2 percent, from $91,000 to $103,880, and the median number of days on the market was down last quarter by six days, or 7 percent, from 88 to 82.

Debra J. Gilson, president of the St. Lawrence Board of Realtors and a broker for County Seat Realty, said that having a low inventory in areas such as Canton and Potsdam could have caused a decrease in sales, although some areas such as Massena still have an overabundance of units on the market. While the number of units sold was slightly down, Mrs. Gilson said, waterfront property purchases drove up the median price last quarter.

“And of course, interest rates are at an all-time low,” she said.

The number of units sold from January to September this year increased from 2015 in St. Lawrence County by 15 units, or 3.2 percent, from 466 to 481. The median price increased from the same period in 2015 by $1,750, or 2 percent, from $87,250 to $89,000, and the median number of days was up by five days, or 5 percent, from 99 to 104.

Lewis County home sales remained relatively flat last quarter compared with the third quarter in 2015, decreasing by only four units, or 6.3 percent, from 64 to 60, according to the Jefferson-Lewis County Board of Realtors. The median price also decreased in Lewis County by $22,750, or 16.5 percent, from $137,750 to $115,000, and the median number of days on the market dropped by 35 days, or 31.3 percent, from 112 to 77.

The number of units sold from January to September this year increased from 2015 in Lewis County by two units, or 1.3 percent, 143 to 145. The median price for 2016, however, decreased from 2015 by $14,500, or 12.2 percent, from $119,000 to $104,500, and the median number of days on the market dropped by 34 days, or 27 percent, from 128 to 94.

When Climax Packaging, Lowville, closed in April and laid off 157 workers, Mr. Raso said that slowed the economy and caused a drop in both sales and the median price last quarter. For this year, Mr. Raso said, an overall lack of employment opportunities in the county affected the median price and number of units sold.

September 2016: Top Transactions

The following property sales were recorded in the Jefferson County Clerk’s Office in August:

$665,000: Aug. 30, Town of Watertown: Four parcels, 0.5548 acres, 231-233 Goodale St., Franklin St., 26-44 Public Square and 124-132 Franklin St., Myron Kehoe, Watertown, Kehick Development LLC, East Syracuse, and Kehoe Development LLC, East Syracuse, sold to Watertown Holdings LLC, Watertown.

$460,000: Aug. 19, Town of Orleans: Two parcels, 1.581 acres, Lake of the Isles, Fred H. Shafer and Primrose M. Shafer, Wellesley Island, sold to Todd W. Cowman and Cindy Bowman, Camden.

$450,000: Aug. 19, Village of Alexandria Bay: 0.545 acres, 5 Fuller St., 5 Fuller St., LLC, Alexandria Bay, sold to CF Coffeen LLC, Alexandria Bay.

$325,000: Aug. 18, town of Clayton: No acreage listed, Lot. No. 4, Block No. 1, Roosevelt Highway Tract, Darcy J Joncas, Taveres, Fla., sold to Potter Boulevard LLC, Clayton.

$303,000: Aug. 8, Town of Orleans: 0.5 acres, Clayton-Alexandria Bay Road, Martin W. Ham, Roanoke, Va., as trustee of the Philip W. Ham and Janice P. Ham Revocable Living Trust Agreement, sold to Mark G. Nowak, Syracuse.

$300,000: Aug. 5, Town of Clayton: 0.13 acres, 538 Riverside Drive, 538 Water Street Corp., Clayton, sold to Village of Clayton, Clayton.

$279,000: Aug. 2, Town of LeRay: 11.49 acres, County Route 16, Nicholas O. Sherwood by his attorney, Karen Ernest, Watertown, and Stephanie L. Sherwood, Evans Mills, sold to Jeffrey D. Foster and Amebr R. Foster, Middletown, R.I.

$275,000: Aug. 2, Town of Watertown: 3.7 acres, town road from Burrville to Middle Road, J. Patrick Campbell and Debra Campbell, Watertown, sold to David C. Meade and Joelle R. Meade, Watertown.

$275,000: Aug. 17, Town of LeRay: 0.504 acres, Lot No. 19, Riverbend Estates, state Route 3, Christopher Sean Cannon and Amanda M. Cannon, Watertown, sold to Peter M. Ward and Lauren A. Ward, Columbia, S.C.

$268,500: Aug. 11, Town of LeRay: 0.573 acres, Cullen Drive, Jason E. Walters and Heather Walters, Watertown, sold to Kevin G. Bischof and Erica L. Bischof, Watertown.

The following property sales were recorded in the St. Lawrence County Clerk’s Office in August:

$450,000: Aug. 9, Village of Potsdam: Parcel 1) 0.64 of an acre more or less, Parcel 2) Unknown acres, bounded by Market and Garden streets, Parcel 3) Unknown acres, bounded by Pierrepont Ave., Parcel 4) 2.97 acres more or less, bounded by Elm St., B.H. Properties Inc., Potsdam, sold to Clark R. Porter, Gouverneur.

$400,000: Aug. 2, Town of Canton: 4 acres more or less, Lot 1, bounded by Ames Road, Neil J. St. Andrews Jr., Colton, sold to The Bicknell Corporation, Potsdam.

$365,000: Aug. 12, Town of Waddington: 0.353 of an acre more or less, bounded by St. Lawrence River Road, Westbrook Bates and Olga Margaret Roman Bates, Waddington, sold to David W. and Julie F. McBath, Waddington.

$350,000: Aug. 11, Village of Norwood: Parcel 1) 0.415 of an acre more or less, bounded by River Street, Parcel 2) 0.54 of an acre more or less, bounded by Spring Street, Parcel 3) 0.292 of an acre more or less, bounded by Spring Street, also in Town of Potsdam: Parcel 1) 0.126 of an acre more or less, Mile Square 10, bounded by Spring Street, Marisa G Perry (executor), Jennifer L Kain, Standish, sold to Gilchrist IV Enterprises LLC, Norwood.
$337,500: Aug. 8, Town of Waddington: 0.345 of an acre more or less, bounded by River Road, Terry K. and Esther M. Alsup, Waddington, sold to Troy F. and Erin E. Groebler, Brasher Falls.

$249,000: Aug. 1, Town of Potsdam: 1.5 acres more or less, Miel Square 68, bounded by Outer Main Street, Christopher and Teresa Stone, Potsdam, sold to Anthony K. And Kristen S. Betrus, Potsdam.

$245,000: Aug. 8, Town of Morristown: 0.75 of an acre more or less, Lot 35, bounded by Blackstone Bay Road East, Marjorie Hamann, Rochester, sold to Dennis and luAnne Murphy, Morristown.

$227,000: Aug. 1, Town of Canton: 16.298 acres more or less, bounded by Hale’s Lot, Joseph L. and Normadine D. Kennedy, Daytona Beach, Fla., sold to Steven G. and Cara Dodge Coffin, Lisbon.

$225,000: Aug. 1, Town of Hammond: 3 acres more or less, bounded ny Little Chippewa Point, Richard and Linda Johnson, Rochester, sold to Little Chippewa Point, LLC, N.Y.

$183,350: Aug. 1, Town of Pierrepont: 0.6678 of an acre more or less, bound by the Underhill Drive, Kelly P. Bush, Hannawa Falls, sold to Richard N. Raymondville.

Where do buyers really want to live?

Lance Evans

Lance Evans

When someone buys a home they aren’t just buying the house, they’re buying a neighborhood as well. But what exactly are potential homebuyers looking for in a new community?

According to the National Association of Realtors “2016 Home Buyers and Sellers Generation Trends” report, how old buyers are impacts the type of neighborhood that they want to call home.

The stage of life a person is in life heavily influences the type of location in which he or she wants to live and what is considered important. A young, childless couple is going to look in different neighborhoods compared with a family of four or a couple searching for their future retirement home.

There are features each generation considers important when choosing a potential neighborhood.

Millennials — 35 and younger

“For younger buyers, being close to work is the most important factor when choosing a neighborhood to live in,” said Debbie Gilson, president of the St. Lawrence County Board of Realtors. “Millennials want a short commute, even if it means living on a smaller lot.”

The price of the homes is also important. Specifically, millennials are looking for affordable homes. Fifty percent of millennials said that the overall affordability of homes was an important factor in choosing a neighborhood.

Gen X — 36 to 50 Years old

When Gen-Xers look for a neighborhood, they are most likely to concentrate on school districts. “When children are in the picture they tend to become the driving force behind major decisions,” according to Randy Raso, president of the Jefferson-Lewis Board of Realtors. “Thirty-four percent of Gen-Xers said that convenience to schools was the deciding factor when choosing a neighborhood.”

Young boomers — 51 to 60 Years old

Young boomers were the most likely to say that the look of a neighborhood was an important factor in deciding where to live. “These buyers aren’t looking for a starter home, they are looking for a dream home and with that comes a beautiful neighborhood,” Raso said.

Twenty-eight percent of young boomers said that neighborhood design was a significant factor in picking a place to live, more than any other generation.

Older boomers 61 to 69 years old

Twenty-four percent of older boomers say that they are looking for a neighborhood that is convenient to entertainment and leisure activities.

“These buyers tend to be considering retirement and are looking for a neighborhood where they can see themselves spending their extra free time,” Gilson said. “They want to move to a community with lots to do, and they do not want to have to go far to do it.”

Silent generation — 70 to 90 years old

Homebuyers who are either near or in retirement care are most concerned with being close to family. Fifty percent of the Silent Generation who participated in the survey said that convenience to friends and family was the factor most likely to influence where they want to live.

If you are interested in selling or buying a home, contact one of our local Realtors. You can find our members at jlbor.com and slcmls.com.


The Tri-County, New York, Women’s Council of Realtors Chapter held its second annual St. Lawrence County “Top Producer” event Sept. 20. It was sponsored by Community Bank, Elite Home Inspections, Fairport Mortgage, First Niagara, Gouverneur Savings & Loan, Key Bank and North Country Savings Bank. There were 37 St. Lawrence County Realtors honored. Awards were based on the number of units sold between Aug. 1, 2015, and July 31, 2016.

The chapter honored Lucille Kassian, Erin Meyer, and Jennifer Stevenson as the top three producers.

The rest of the Realtors, listed alphabetically, are: Gail Abplanalp, Sharon Alford, Christine Amo, Tracy Bernard, Penny Bogardus, Allison Chadwick, Nikki Coates, Patricia Collins, Philip Collins, Rick Cutway, Randy Durham, Sarah Franklin, Cathy Garlock, Matthew Garlock, Rowena General, Debbie Gilson, Karen Gurrola, Michael Hall, Janet Handschuh, Marcia Henry, Michael Kassian, Suzanne Liberty, Brittany Matott, Martha Morrison, Timothy Post, Brenda Powell, Doreen Radway, Margaret Sherman, Scarlett Slack, Lori Snyder, Vickie Staie, Nicholas Sterling, Scott Woods, and Cheryl Yelle.

LANCE M. EVANS is the executive officer of the Jefferson-Lewis Board of Realtors and the St. Lawrence County Board of Realtors. Contact him at levans@nnymls.com. His column appears monthly in NNY Business.

 

August 2016 Feature Story: Real Estate

Mixed bag in Q2 real estate report

Jefferson up, Lewis down, St. Lawrence flat

By Marcus Wolf, NNY Business

Second quarter home sales in Jefferson County are up from the same quarter last year, but are down in Lewis County and relatively the same in St. Lawrence County. [Read more…]

August 2016: Real Estate Roundup

Student debt’s impact on home ownership

Lance Evans

Lance Evans

A survey on student loan debt and housing released in mid-June showed that 71 percent of non-homeowners with student loans believe their debt is stymieing their ability to purchase a home and slightly more than half of all borrowers expect a delay in buying a home by more than five years. [Read more…]

August 2016: Top Transactions

The following property sales were recorded in the Jefferson County Clerk’s Office in June 2016:

[Read more…]

July 2016: Top Transactions

The following property sales were recorded in the Jefferson County Clerk’s Office in May:

[Read more…]

July 2016: Real Estate Roundup

Top real estate questions and answers

Lance Evans

Lance Evans

I recently spoke to the Watertown Rotary Club about a number of real estate issues, including housing statistics and took questions from those assembled.

Is cash is king?

There is an expression that “cash is king.” However, is that true in real estate? During my talk I noted that cash transactions normally make up about 25 percent of residential sale transactions nationally. For 2016 so far, 35.7 percent are cash. Locally, this year Jefferson County cash sales have accounted for 33.3 percent of residential sales (22 percent in 2015), 35 percent in Lewis County (26 percent in 2015), and 25.8 percent in St. Lawrence (22.6 percent in 2015). While St. Lawrence County as not followed the national trend, why have Jefferson and Lewis counties? Looking at the median price — the price where half the prices are lower and half higher — the cash sale median is $50,000 while the median for non-cash properties is $140,000. Many of the cash sales were due to foreclosure. In fact, about 55 percent of the residential listings that sold for $50,000 or less were foreclosure sales. [Read more…]