May 2015: Real Estate Roundup

FAA proposes rules for drone flights

Columnist Lance Evans

Columnist Lance Evans

Real estate agents across the country have been waiting for the Federal Aviation Administration to release guidelines permitting the use of drones for commercial purposes, such as marketing real estate. Last month, the FAA released its proposed rules, which would allow realty professionals to use drones to aid their clients in marketing and selling properties. [Read more…]

April 2015: Real Estate Roundup

Federal Fair Housing Act turns 47

Columnist Lance Evans

Columnist Lance Evans

The sale and purchase of a home is one of the most significant events a person will experience in his or her lifetime. It is more that the simple purchase of housing, for it includes the hopes, dreams, aspirations and economic destiny of those involved. Recognizing this, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the Fair Housing Act in April of 1968. This landmark legislation is the reason that April is known as Fair Housing Month. During this 47th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, the Jefferson-Lewis and St. Lawrence County Boards of Realtors have reached out to numerous legislative bodies and asked them to declare April as Fair Housing Month. [Read more…]

March 2015: Real Estate Roundup

Drum, NNY a winning combination

Columnist, Lance Evans

Columnist Lance Evans

Planned. Positioned. Proven. With the approach of the March 20 Army listening session and public rally, that is a slogan we have been seeing and hearing often. The rally and session that follows will take place at Jefferson Community College at 5 p.m. and it’s your chance to tell the Army how you feel about the potential loss of 16,000 soldiers and civilians at Fort Drum. [Read more…]

February 2015: Real Estate Roundup

Let consumers decide on sprinklers

Columnist, Lance Evans

Columnist, Lance Evans

Recently, there has been publicity surrounding a push by the Firemen’s Association of the State of New York to have the New York State Fire Prevention and Building Code Council update the state Uniform Fire Prevention and Building Code to mandate that builders install low-flow automatic sprinklers in all new one- to two-family homes and any home that undergoes substantial reconstruction of 50 percent or more. [Read more…]

Flood insurance a longtime concern

Real Estate Roundup column || by Lance Evans

Real Estate Roundup column || by Lance Evans

With the number of waterways in Northern New York, flood insurance has become increasingly important. Over the past century, floods have claimed more lives and property than any other natural disaster with flood disasters declared in every state as the result of melting snow, severe rain storms and hurricanes, and rising water along lakes, rivers, levees and dams. [Read more…]

Real Estate Roundup: SLC Realtors recognized for service

The St. Lawrence County Board of Realtors held a mixer at Phoenix on the Bay in Ogdensburg Aug. 6. It had a dual purpose, allowing affiliates to showcase their products and services and to recognize Realtor members for their years of service. Each Realtor member received a Realtor pin based on the number of years of continuous Realtor membership (rounded down to the nearest five-year period). In future years, we will honor members only when they reach five-year milestones. [Read more…]

Consider needs, options in search

Lance Evans

Lance Evans

Recently, I had the chance to participate in an unusual activity for me — house hunting. Even more unusual, the house is one that neither I, nor any family member, will probably ever live in. How did this come about? [Read more…]

Sell with a Realtor for better outcome

Lance Evans

Lance Evans

Recent media reports have touted selling your home yourself, more commonly called for sale by owner or FSBO. It seems like a nice idea: sell your home yourself and save the price of a commission. After all, how hard can it be to sell a property that you know so well?

It turns out that it is not as easy a task as you would think. There is more to the process than simply putting a sign in front and sitting back and waiting for offers to roll in.

Before a property is put on the market, sellers are required by law to fill out numerous forms, whether the property is listed with a real estate broker or if the owner is selling it by him or herself. Some of these carry penalties if not filled out and available to a buyer at the time the buyer submits a purchase offer. Realtors are well versed in which forms are needed for each type of transaction.

Sellers also often underestimate the amount of time required to market and show their property, overestimate the value of their property and then have to deal with security concerns as a result of strangers having access to their home. [Read more…]

Re-register for STAR by year’s end

Lance Evans

Lance Evans

Homeowners who receive the Basic STAR exemption need to re-register with the New York State Tax Department in order to receive the exemption in 2014 and subsequent years. There is no need to register to receive the 2013 STAR exemption or to re-register every year. Based on the information provided, the Tax Department will monitor homeowners’ eligibility in future years. Registration ends Dec. 31 and can be completed by clicking on “Register for STAR” at www.tax.ny.gov or by phone at (518) 457-2036.

Senior citizens who receive the Enhanced STAR exemption are not affected by the new registration requirement. They must, however, continue to apply annually or participate in the Income Verification Program. [Read more…]

Homeownership is not a tax loophole

Lance Evans

There has been a lot of talk recently about various ways to reduce the deficit without raising taxes. One of the ideas is to eliminate the Mortgage Interest Deduction, the deduction that homeowners are allowed to take on a mortgage’s interest.

This is a bad idea for a number of reasons:

  • The MID is not a new tax deduction; it was introduced along with the income tax in 1913. The MID allows homeowners who itemize their taxes to deduct interest paid on mortgage debt up to $1 million interest on a primary residence and an additional home, and also interest paid on home equity debt up to $100,000.
  • Homeowners currently pay 80 to 90 percent of the federal income tax. Eliminating the MID would increase the share homeowners pay to 95 percent. Normally, nine out of 10 home buyers borrow money to purchase a home. Housing-related tax provisions like the MID help people who don’t have hundreds of thousands of dollars in savings to buy a home outright, allowing them to begin building their future through home ownership. It turns out that eliminating the MID would be a tax increase for a substantial number of homeowners, an increase that would fall heavily on middle and lower income families. Of the families who claim the MID, 63 percent earn less than $100,000 per year. Another 25 percent earn between $100,000 and $250,000. Only 12 percent of the total is claimed by taxpayers earning $250,000 or more. Removing the MID will adversely affect the wealth of middle and lower income families and make it harder for them to achieve homeownership. Is focusing solely on tax rates a better goal than protecting the wealth of the middle class?
  • The MID can mean real savings for real families at tax time. If a family bought a house this year with a $200,000, 30-year fixed-rate mortgage with an interest rate of 4.5 percent, they could save nearly $3,500 in federal taxes when they file next year. Is it worth jeopardizing home ownership considering the boost it brings to a community and the economy? Homeownership promotes neighborhood stability, improves school performance and enhances family health. Home sales also have various economic spin-offs; real estate transactions touch an estimated 84 different jobs and the equivalent of one job is generated for every two homes sold. Of course, this does not include the economic activity connected to ongoing home maintenance.
  • Reducing or eliminating the MID could tip the economy into another recession. This is not the time to have more job losses or economic turmoil. The wealth of most middle class Americans is connected to their home. Millions of Americans bought their homes with the understanding that mortgage interest is tax deductible, and many of them have steadily paid down their mortgages to build equity in their home.

Eliminating or reducing the MID would destroy the hard-earned equity of all homeowners, regardless of tax status, which would in turn hurt the economic and societal spin-offs of homeownership.

The MID is an important part of the American dream of homeownership. While you can imagine that Realtors and other real estate professionals are concerned about a possible elimination or reduction in the MID, a Harris Interactive survey of 3,000 homeowners and renters shows Americans agree: In the survey, nearly 75 percent of homeowners and 66 percent of renters said that the MID was extremely or very important to them.

Contact our elected officials — U.S. Rep. William L. Owens, D-Plattsburgh, or U.S. Sens. Charles Schumer and Kirsten E. Gillibrand — to get your voice heard on this issue. To learn more, visit www.houselogic.com and search “Mortgage Interest Deduction.”

Lance M. Evans is the executive officer of the Jefferson-Lewis Board of Realtors and the St. Lawrence County Board of Realtors. He has lived in the north country since 1985. Contact him at levans@nnymls.com. His column appears monthly.