South Jefferson Physical Therapy moves to new site in Adams

South Jefferson Physical Therapy co-owners Heather Miller and Joel Grimshaw will host a grand reopening Friday at their new location on Route 11 in Adams. Justin Sorensen / NNY Business

South Jefferson Physical Therapy co-owners Heather Miller and Joel Grimshaw will host a grand reopening Friday at their new location on Route 11 in Adams. Justin Sorensen / NNY Business

South Jefferson Physical Therapy’s new home at 70 N. Main St. — roughly double the size of its old location — will provide much-needed space to serve patients.

The clinic, which relocated from Tops Friendly Markets plaza off Route 11 at the end of June, will host a grand reopening event from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday at its new headquarters. Food and refreshments will be served.

Previously Lunman’s Furniture and Appliance Center, the 8,640-square-foot building was bought for $250,000 in May from David H. Lunman by Joel H. Grimshaw and Heather A. Miller, co-owners of the clinic, who both hold doctorates in physical therapy.

The clinic occupies about half of the massive building, while the other half is available for lease. Its newly renovated space includes a full-size gym with exercise equipment and five rooms for patients. Memberships are offered for $35 a month at the gym, which includes cardiovascular and weightlifting machines.

The clinic’s old space, by contrast, had three patient rooms and about half the amount of equipment, said Mr. Grimshaw, 41. That space, which opened in 2003, had limited the number of clients it could serve.

“Our business had grown the first five years after opening, and then it plateaued and has fluctuated,” said Mr. Grimshaw, a native of Henderson. “We would see between 140 to 160 visits total visits from patients a week, with some coming in multiple times. If we add another physical therapist here, I think we could go to the 160-to-190 range.” [Read more...]

NYPA allocates power for Potsdam, Gouverneur plants in another boost for St. Lawrence County

On the same day the north country learned 40 jobs will be created in a $21 million expansion of Corning’s Canton plant, St. Lawrence County received another economic shot in the arm when the New York Power Authority approved low-cost power allocations for two more manufacturers that will keep or add jobs with capital investments.

The allocations will go to Potsdam Specialty Paper and Riverside Iron, Gouverneur, under the ReCharge NY program, NYPA announced Tuesday. The low-cost power is expected to leverage an estimated $14.3 million in capital investments and support 79 jobs, 12 of which will be created.

“I think anytime we see power allocation in the county is a good thing, and to have three different areas, with Corning in the Canton area, Potsdam Paper and Riverside Iron in Gouverneur, is crucial,” said Patrick J. Kelly, CEO of the St. Lawrence County Industrial Development Agency. “These are also three different areas that are receiving this allocation. It is very beneficial to their operations and in turn a good thing for the county.”

Potsdam Specialty Paper, 547 Sissonville Road, will receive 2,116 kilowatts for its commitment to retain its 67 jobs and invest $14 million into its facility over the next five years. [Read more...]

Cuomo to announce $21 million Corning plant expansion project

Corning will expand production at its Canton plant in a $21 million project that will create 40 permanent jobs with the help of a low-cost power allocation, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo is expected to announce today.

The plant on McAdoo Road in the town of DeKalb will increase production of high-fused silica glass used in the semiconductor industry. The plant supplies microchips for computers, cellphones and other electronics. It also makes specialized glass products for the U.S. Department of Defense and the aerospace industry.

The 30,700-square-foot expansion will include 23,500 square feet for increased production and a 7,200-square-foot warehouse. Corning is expected to host a formal ceremony next month for the start of construction.

The New York Power Authority is allocating 2.1 megawatts to the plant for the expansion.

“The St. Lawrence-FDR power plant is crucial for economic development in Northern New York,” Gil C. Quiniones, president and chief executive officer of NYPA, said in a news release Monday. “It’s a top priority for NYPA to utilize its low-cost hydropower in ways that will yield the greatest results and Corning’s commitment toward the creation of 40 high-paying jobs in the region is exactly that, a great result.”

The low-cost hydropower will be provided to Corning under a seven-year contract and is drawn from a block of St. Lawrence electricity known as Preservation Power.

“Corning’s decision to expand its operations in Canton is certainly great news. It is a perfect marriage when St. Lawrence hydropower creates jobs in the north country,” NYPA trustee Eugene L. Nicandri said.

Corning’s Canton facility receives a 2.2 megawatt allocation of ReCharge NY power, which was approved by the NYPA trustees in April 2012 in exchange for the firm’s commitment to retain its nearly 200 positions.

In addition to the new permanent jobs, which NYPA says already are being added, the capital investments by the company are expected to support dozens of temporary construction jobs.

Empire State Development is providing the company $750,000 in Excelsior Jobs Program tax credits to assist with the job creation project.

“This allocation by NYPA will reduce Corning’s energy cost, which is a major expenditure at the Canton plant,” Patrick Jackson, director of Corning’s Global Energy Management, said in the release.

Under state law, allocations of power to Northern New York businesses from the St. Lawrence hydroelectric facility are for firms in Franklin, Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties. The electricity is provided at a price that is currently 40 percent less than the wholesale market price in the region. Preservation Power allocations support hundreds of jobs in St. Lawrence County.

By Amanda Purcell, Johnson Newspapers

Dollar Tree to buy peer Family Dollar stores

Dollar Tree announced today it is buying rival discount chain Family Dollar for $8.5 billion, taking over about 8,000 stores.

The retail discounter will have more than 13,000 combined locations after the merger, becoming the largest player in the dollar store market by surpassing current leader Dollar General Corp., which has about 11,300 stores. Dollar Tree will continue to operate Family Dollar stores under the same brand name according to terms of the transaction, which is expected to close by early 2015.

Family Dollar now operates six stores in Jefferson County (Alexandria Bay, Clayton, West Carthage, Adams and two in Watertown), six in St. Lawrence County (Massena, Ogdensburg, Potsdam, Canton, De Kalb and Gouverneur) and one in Lewis County, based in Lowville.

The company did not disclose whether any Dollar Tree or Family Dollar locations would close under the plan, or if jobs would be cut. The combined company will operate stores in 48 states and five Canadian provinces and employ more than 145,000 associates.

Dollar Tree, unlike Family Dollar, sells all of its store merchandise for $1 or less. The company said its fixed pricing has helped attract more customers and increase sales, but it has also created a challenge as inflation has pushed up its costs and pressured profit margins.

Dollar Tree CEO Bob Sasser called the merger with Family Dollar a “transformational opportunity” in Monday’s news release.

“This acquisition will extend our reach to lower-income customers and strengthen and diversify our store footprint,” Mr. Sasser said in the release. “We plan to leverage best practices across both organizations to deliver significant synergies, while we accelerate and augment Family Dollar’s recently introduced strategic initiatives. Combined, our growth potential is enhanced with improved opportunities to increase the productivity of the stores and to open more stores across multiple banners.”

Knowlton Technologies to be sold to Eastman Chemical Co.

Knowlton employs about 130 workers at its Factory Street plant. Justin Sorensen / NNY Business

Knowlton employs about 130 workers at its Factory Street plant. Justin Sorensen / NNY Business

Knowlton Technologies LLC, the country’s longest-running paper mill and one of the city’s most prominent businesses, is being sold to Eastman Chemical Co. of Kingsport, Tenn., Eastman announced Thursday. [Read more...]

Schumer pushes for biogas tax credit for upstate dairy industry

Schumer

Schumer

Sen. Charles E. Schumer is making a push in Congress for a tax credit to spur the construction of biogas facilities in upstate New York, which could be used by manufacturers of dairy products to convert waste into renewable energy.

Called the Biogas Investment Tax Credit Act, the proposal would provide a tax credit equal to 30 percent of the cost of building a biogas processing plant, Mr. Schumer, D-N.Y., said Wednesday during a conference call with reporters. Those savings would be an incentive for dairy farmers and manufacturers of yogurt and cheese to invest in biogas processing plants, he said.

Such facilities would enable them to covert whey byproduct or manure into energy to offset on-site energy needs, or to sell back to the energy grid at a profit. [Read more...]

Farmland in south Jefferson County sold for $4.2 million

Larry F. Stinson, seen at his business Tug Edge Outdoor & More in Adams in 2010, has sold about 1,070 acres of farmland. Justin Sorensen / NNY Business

Larry F. Stinson, seen at his business Tug Edge Outdoor & More in Adams in 2010, has sold about 1,070 acres of farmland. Justin Sorensen / NNY Business

Former dairy farmer Larry F. Stinson has sold more than 1,000 acres of farmland in Adams, Ellisburg and Lorraine for $4.2 million, according to Jefferson County property records.

The farmland, owned by the Adams resident since 1976, went for about $3,925 per acre to Eastman Farms, a large dairy operation with 1,200 head of cattle at 10798 Route 193 in Ellisburg. [Read more...]

Sackets unveils $7 million proposal for downtown facelift

The artistic rendering illustrates proposed improvements along West Main Street planned by the village of Sackets Harbor. BERNIER, CARR & ASSOCIATES

The artistic rendering illustrates proposed improvements along West Main Street planned by the village of Sackets Harbor. BERNIER, CARR & ASSOCIATES

The village has introduced a $7 million proposal to reconstruct West Main Street and upgrade its water plant during the next three years.

About 30 property owners on West Main Street would be affected by the reconstruction project, which would run from the intersection of North Broad Street to the street’s western end at the Sackets Harbor Battlefield State Historic Site; sections of Hill, Ray and Ambrose streets also would be rebuilt. Water and sewer lines about 120 years old would be replaced under the plan, which also calls for the installation of sidewalks, granite curbing, LED street lighting and an 1,800-foot stormwater drainage system and planting of trees.

To enhance the aesthetics of the downtown area, the village also plans to apply for funding from National Grid to bury a 1,700-foot section of aerial electric, telephone and television wires.

In addition, a historic recreational area named Market Square Park would be developed in front of the Sackets Harbor Visitors Center off the street. A gateway to the battlefield would be built at the western end of the street, with the goal of attracting visitors to the Pickering-Beach Museum and other historic buildings inside the park. [Read more...]

St. Lawrence Seaway steel shipment boost largely due to auto industry demand

A large jump in steel product shipments through the St. Lawrence Seaway this season has been due to demand from the U.S. automobile industry, among other factors.

According to a news release sent out by the Chamber of Marine Commerce, the shipments to ports of Cleveland, Detroit, Indiana-Burns Harbor and Milwaukee also are a result of the improving American economy.

“In addition to an upbeat auto industry and an improving economy, robust oil and gas industries depend upon manufactured iron and steel goods,” St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. spokeswoman Nancy T. Alcalde said.

General cargo shipments, including steel slabs and coils and aluminum, totaled 872,000 metric tons from March 25 to June 30, according to the Seaway Corp.

This represented a 44 percent spike from 2013.

“We are seeing exports as well as imports. Advance notifications from industries suggested 2014 would be a good year, and we’re heading in that direction,” Ms. Alcalde said. “An example is that 20 high-value GE locomotives have been shipped through the Seaway to Mozambique and 30 more are set to leave this summer. Wind component movements to Duluth and Muskegon are on the rise. The new liner service between Cleveland and Antwerp has also resulted in new cargo tonnage for this navigation season.”

A Canadian grain rush is another factor behind the increase, according to the Marine Commerce release. “However, total cargo shipments through the St. Lawrence Seaway from March 25 to June 30 were 11.1 million metric tons, down 7 percent compared to 2013 due to decreases in iron ore exports and coal traffic,” it read.

Ms. Alcalde said that the Seaway Corp. is expecting the steel shipment increase to continue in the foreseeable future.

“The slow start to the navigation season was due to the lengthy winter that lasted well into April” she said.

We expect cargo tonnage to continue to increase for the remainder of 2014 and improve upon last year’s tonnage performance,” Ms. Alcalde said.

By Victor Barbosa, Johnson Newspapers

Potsdam Bagelry gets news owners, plans to produce artisan coffee

New Bagelry owners B. Ryan Dunphey, left, and Gabriel A. Ockrin stand next to a picture of the business taken in 1982. Melanie Kimbler-Lago / NNY Business

New Bagelry owners B. Ryan Dunphey, left, and Gabriel A. Ockrin stand next to a picture of the business taken in 1982. Melanie Kimbler-Lago / NNY Business

Artisan coffee culture is making its debut at the Bagelry this summer with the help of new owners Gabriel A. Ockrin and B. Ryan Dunphey, two men who left behind careers in corporate America to follow a shared passion.

The partners plan to infuse the long-standing Potsdam business with big-city coffee culture, while staying faithful to north country lifestyles. [Read more...]