Agricultural Outlook for 2019

ALYSSA COUSE

This time last year, I wrote about the upcoming farm bill and hopes for 2018.  As government typically moves at a molasses-like pace, here we are into 2019 talking about the same farm bill, and with the same hopes for the new year as the last.

    Here are a few reactions from the recent passage of the farm bill from New York Farm Bureau President and NNY farmer, David Fisher and Secretary of Agriculture, Sonny Perdue respectively.  Both comments focus on the dairy safety net program, which has been a hot topic during the current crisis in the industry:

    “Today’s final vote for the 2018 Farm Bill is a major victory for New York’s farmers, rural communities and consumers. Farmers needed stronger risk management tools in place moving into next year where there are signs that the economic stress will continue in the farming community. In particular, the new Farm Bill enhances the dairy safety net for farms of every size, including increasing the margin that qualifies for federal insurance programs. New York Farm Bureau also appreciates the research and support programs in the bill that will benefit New York’s specialty crop producers. Having some certainty moving forward in challenging times is a relief for farmers.” – NYFB President David Fisher 

    “More than 21,400 dairy producers opted for coverage through the Margin Protection Program for Dairy (MPP-Dairy) in 2018, up by more than 2,000 producers from the previous year. This U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) program was significantly updated in February by the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, and Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said those changes attracted more producers to enroll in the safety net program or to increase their coverage.

    Dairy producers have long been battling low prices, high input costs, and a surplus in the global market. Unfortunately, the 2014 Farm Bill did not provide a sufficient safety net to dairy producers and so it was timely that Congress opted to provide additional support through the Margin Protection Program las February,” – Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue

    Economic predictions seem to point towards an average increase of only about $1 per hundred weight of milk over 2019.  While it is nowhere near a complete solution, both Fisher and Perdue indicate that the new programs should provide some more relief to farmers than previous programs have.

    A strong leader is a vital role during hard times. Cornell University and Cooperative Extension have several programs currently in session to help dairy producers be the best mangers they can be.  Academy of Dairy Executives is being hosted in the north country region this year and kicked off in December.  Designed for future managers, this program focuses on building effective teams, decision making, and financial stability.  These skills are vital for survival in the current dairy market.

    For more on the program CLICK HERE.

    At the first Academy for Dairy Executives session, agriculture workforce specialist with Cornell Cooperative Extension, Richard Stup, included a slide in his presentation about dairy industry workforce and team building that stuck with me:

    “Never waste a good crisis”

Teams need some adversity to really grow

Stay positive and point out little wins

Frame up the story as eventual victory over adversity

    While this message could be applicable to any field, it rings loud and clear for agriculture right now.  By viewing industry challenges as a chance for growth or improvement and pointing out the little victories, such as a reduced vet bill this month, are much easier to focus on than the stagnant milk price or more bills.  Staying positive and fine tuning efficiencies on the farm may sound easier said than done but can be attainable if everyone is on the same page.

    Other upcoming programs in the north country include Dairy Day, Crop Congress, and monthly shop talks.  In addition to research updates and economic outlooks, winter programs like Crop Congress will feature information on how to best utilize your acres for your farm, and for the volatile market changes we’ve seen.  For more information on dates and locations, visit ccejefferson.org or check social media outlets!

So how can you help the north country’s farmers this year?

    Chat with them. Purchase New York products. Have a question about why the farm down the road does something? Ask.  By connecting with your local farms whether by farm tour, farmer’s market, or a simple conversation at the end of the driveway, trust can be strengthened between producer and consumer, which benefits everyone.  

CLICK HERE for the local food guide!

Alyssa Couse is an agricultural outreach educator for Cornell Cooperative Extension of Jefferson County. Born and raised in the north country, she feels at home working with Jefferson County residents, both two-legged and four-legged. Contact her at amc557@cornell.edu.

June 2016: Agri-Business

JeffersonCountyAgriculture.com goes live

Jay Matteson

Jay Matteson

Mark D. Waterhouse, president of Garnet Consulting Services, Pleasant Valley, Conn., spoke at the Jefferson County Economic Development Forum on May 18. Mr. Waterhouse is recognized within the economic development community for his success in helping communities attract new development and grow existing business. During Mr. Waterhouse’s commentary, he discussed effective marketing techniques to attract new business. His remarks and the data he presented demonstrated the needs for improved efforts and support for some of the actions we’ve taken to improve our presence. [Read more…]