Community Spirit Youth Giving Challenge

Rande Richardson

“Love is at the root of everything…all learning, all relationships…love or the lack of it. A great gift of any adult to a child is to love what you do in front of them. Let them catch the attitude.” –Fred Rogers


American treasure, children’s television icon and everyone’s favorite neighbor, Fred Rogers, is being honored with documentaries and on postage stamps in this year when he would have turned 90 and as Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood commemorates its 50th anniversary. Mister Rogers showed us all how a little compassion, kindness and love can make a world of difference in every neighborhood.

    Recently, the Northern New York Community Foundation, in partnership with Stage Notes, announced the results of the first “Community Spirit Youth Giving Challenge.” This competition was an invitation for area middle school students to talk about the things they love about their community. They were competing to award a total of $10,000 to area charitable organizations. Whether they realized it or not, they were really exploring, thinking, and reflecting on the importance of love of community, love of the place where they live, and making it better for them and their neighbors.

    What does an ideal community look like through the eyes of our young people? Of the 62 essays submitted from 9 school districts, there were several common themes including love, kindness, joy, caring, connecting, safety, support, helping, togetherness, diversity, belonging, neighbors, beauty, happiness, betterment, belonging, sharing and respect. These young adults also recognized that it takes all different types of organizations to help create and sustain their best vision of their community as they nominated charities that they felt help supported their love of community.

    These young minds demonstrated an awareness that quality of life includes addressing the most basic of needs as well as the enhancement of quality of life. Sackets Harbor Central School student Adelyne Jareo, wrote an essay that won a $1,000 grant for Meals on Wheels of Greater Watertown. “To me, community means living through both good and bad times with people who love and support you,” she said. “Community is about connection and brightening someone’s day and making it better even in the smallest way possible.” I can assure you that if you were able to read every essay submitted, you would be inspired.

    Other organizations receiving grants include: Croghan Free Library, Lewis County Humane Society, Credo Community Center, Jefferson County SPCA, Carthage YMCA, Orchestra of Northern New York, Thousand Islands Emergency Rescue Service, PIVOT, Children’s Home of Jefferson County, Children’s Miracle Network, Croghan Volunteer Fire Department, Historical Association of South Jefferson, Cape Vincent Community Library, Clayton Figure Skating Club, Clayton Youth Commission, Hawn Memorial Library, Relay for Life of Jefferson County, and Thousands Islands Area Habitat for Humanity.

    As generational shifts continue, programs like this not only provide insight into how those who will inherit our communities think, they also are a proactive way to instill concepts of civic engagement and nurture the importance of giving of oneself to maintain a vibrant community. It is easy at times to cast doubt upon our community’s future. Indeed, recent generations relate differently, communicate in new ways and find relevancy in contrast to their parents, grandparents and great-grandparents.

    I asked my 14-year-old son if he knew who Mister Rogers was. He did not. While the 1970’s me was stunned, I suspect if he watched the first broadcast of Mister Rogers’ neighborhood, the messages delivered would apply even more today. We all must find ways to continue to do all we can to pass along to our community’s children an affirmation of love. Our world needs it now more than ever. Every participant in the inaugural Community Spirit Youth Giving Challenge gives us all reason to be hopeful and confident.

                We must not stop there. We must look for all the ways to present positive role models for our children and introducing them to ways to make a difference in expressions that are meaningful to them. We must show them how much we love our community. We must encourage and challenge them to carry the torch forward.  With your help, the Community Foundation will remain vigilant in providing pathways that will make all of our neighborhoods, and the organizations that enhance them, better. Our greatest gift to those who have come before us is to make sure those who come after see our example and love it enough to “catch” the attitude to perpetuate it.

rande richardson is executive director of the Northern New York Community Foundation. He is a lifelong Northern New York resident and former funeral director. Contact him at rande@nnycf.org.

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February 2016: Nonprofits Today

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2015 Class of 20 Under 40

NNYB_December2015_cover

This year’s class of 20 Under 40:

A development director, a news anchor, an assistant principal, an operations and IT supervisor, an advertising account executive, a financial director, health care professionals, a chief of staff and business owner, a village mayor, a civil engineer, an installation forester, a company president and a few directors.

Our fifth annual 20 Under 40 class was the most competitive field yet, and these individuals represent a snapshot of Northern New York’s most accomplished, dedicated and involved young professionals, across three Northern New York counties and across a wide range of nonprofits, businesses.
All of these young men and women are involved in some shape or form in their community, whether by serving on an organization’s board, creating an annual Christmas tree lighting ceremony, hosting a polar bear dip, or something as simple as helping to coaching a community basketball team or participating a charity 5K run/walk.

All of these leaders, who are between the ages of 25 and 39, were chosen not only by the editors and staff of NNY Business magazine, but by virtue of glowing recommendations from their peers and employers. And not only do these emerging leaders, who embody the prized north country values of compassion, hard work and selflessness, make time in hectic schedules to volunteer in the community, they give their very best in challenging career fields each and every day, all out of an effort to make the place they have chosen to stay in and call home the very best place it can be.

Caryn L. White, 38: Credo Community Center

 

Caryn White has never been one to back away from something that confuses her. In fact, she said, the most puzzling days are the ones that keep her getting out of bed in the morning. [Read more…]

October 2015: Nonprofits Today

Transparent nonprofits build trust

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Bob Gorman

An employee of the Jefferson Rehabilitation Center was recently arrested for allegedly stealing $45,000 from the bank accounts of JRC clients.

Such news is the last thing any nonprofit wants to hear. But the good news is that JRC did the right thing — it investigated the allegations, called police and is now letting the chips fall where they may. [Read more…]

October 2015 20 Questions: On Leadership

On leadership

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Since NNY Business began publishing monthly in December 2010, we have featured a wide-ranging, in-depth interview with a different north country business or leader 11 times a year, skipping December for our 20 Under 40 emerging leaders issue. Our 54 featured interviews to date have not been limited to the for-profit sector. We’ve sat down with nonprofit and not-for-profit leaders, and educational and health care leaders. The 20 questions that follow are the best of leadership from nearly five years of interviews. [Read more…]

Credo Community Center 40th Anniversary Celebration – July 2013 at Hilton Garden Inn, Watertown

Credo Community Center for the Treatment of Addictions celebrated its 40th anniversary on Aug. 1 at the Hilton Garden Inn, Watertown.

20 Q: James P. Scordo, Credo Community Center

James P. Scordo, Executive Director of Credo Community Center for the Treatment of Addiction. Photo by Justin Sorensen/ NNY Business

Credo director says overall wellness, integrity key to healthy community

After leading Credo Community Center for the Treatment of Addictions for more than two decades, Executive Director James P. Scordo, 55, reflects on the success of the organization’s treatment model as it celebrates its 40th year. Despite the challenges facing nonprofits, Mr. Credo believes a healthy community can be built and sustained through a focus on an individual’s overall wellness. Credo will hold an anniversary celebration on Aug. 1 at 6 p.m. at the Hilton Garden Inn, Watertown.

NNYB: What qualities do you think are important for any leader?
SCORDO: A CEO kind of has to be a jack of all trades, but you need to be a foundation. You need to be a person of integrity—you need to be honest with your clients, your employees ans the people you interact with. You need to be able to lead but step aside and let people do their jobs. You need to empower employees and provide opportunities to grow. The team approach is crucial. As a leader, I look at myself almost like a coach. The best thing I can do is hire good people and surround myself with good people that will help us make the best decisions. We look for quality employees that value the language of our organization and that are going to make a difference in people’s lives.

NNYB: How are you funded?
SCORDO: We get a third of our funds from the state, then we rely on county funds, United Way dollars, donations and various fundraisers. [Read more…]