Trust In Your New York State Guide

Randy Young

If you are interested in fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, whitewater canoeing, rafting, or rock and ice climbing, but unfamiliar with how to get started, there is a New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) licensed guide willing to make sure your experience is less stressful and more enjoyable. 

    Guides are helpful in ensuring safe travel, accomplishing the requirements to become an ADK 46er, navigating unfamiliar waters in a canoe, kayaking to set up a primitive campsite, and much more. 

    Craig L. Tryon, a New York state licensed guide, said, “Hiring a competent guide takes all the guesswork out of planning the trip. If you are a competent wilderness traveler, a guide can help you plan your trip into an area you are unfamiliar with. They can provide area tips and information that would take you weeks to get on your own. 

    In his 34 years of being a licensed guide, Craig knows that the better the experience visitors have, the more likely visitors will return for more outdoor adventures. With more than six million acres to explore in the Adirondacks, 2,000 miles of snowmobile trails, and 5,000 miles of public trails, there are plenty of activities that keep people coming to Northern New York. 

    Outdoor recreation contributes greatly to the local economy and fuels tourism — the state’s third largest industry. Tourism accounts for one in 10 jobs, $14 billion in wages and salaries, and $41.8 billion in consumer spending. 

    There are lots of choices when it comes to picking a tourism destination in New York state and DEC-licensed guides depend on helping customers navigate those choices. There are more than 2,000 licensed guides statewide, of which 209 are available for service in Region 6. 

    Most individuals engaging in the business of guiding on state lands and waters need a license issued by DEC. Environmental Program Specialist Colleen Kayser administers the state’s Licensed Guide Program as part her work in DEC’s Division of Forest Protection. “An exam is held at 10 DEC locations statewide, as well as at the New York State Outdoor Guide Association’s annual winter meeting,” said Kayser. “Once all the requirements are met, I update the applicant’s information and issue the license, which consists of a laminated license, a guides pin, and a certificate. Licenses expire every five years.” 

    Besides assisting the general public, licensed guides are often members of local search-and-rescue teams and partner with DEC to search for lost individuals. 

    Tryon said guiding has enjoyed a long and colorful history. Early surveyors and sportsmen used knowledge of local woodsmen in the area to find their way in New York’s vast uncharted wilderness. 

    Guiding became an important profession and part of the economy of Northern New York in the 1800s, due in part to the popularity of William H. H. Murray’s book “Adventures in the Wilderness, or Camp Life in the Adirondacks.” Murray made his guide, John Plumley, a central character of his adventure stories. 

    “In the 1970s, a renewed interest in environmental issues began to come to the forefront. Today licensed guides are more qualified and trained to provide an educational and enjoyable experience for travelers,” said Tryon. “There has never been a dull moment on any guide trip I have had the pleasure to lead. Clients that I have taken on trips include many typical people just looking for a getaway, police officers, a Secret Service officer, a U.S. Pentagon officer that was an imbedded reporter with troops in Iraq, doctors, an FBI agent, a U.S. Customs and Border patrol officer, a postmaster from Indiana, and even one of the actors on ‘The Young and the Restless.’ With the wide variety of clients and interests on trips, conversations around the nightly campfire are very interesting, to say the least.” 

    For more information on upcoming test dates to be a New York state licensed guide, go here: https://www.dec.ny.gov/permits/30969.html. For the latest updates on #DEC50 and DEC’s celebration of the agency’s 50th anniversary, visit https://www.dec.ny.gov/about/9677.html. 

Reflecting Back on 50-Years of Environmental Conservation

Randy Young

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will celebrate its 50th anniversary later this year with a series of regional and statewide events to mark the occasion. DEC was established on the first Earth Day celebration on April 22, 1970. Since that time, DEC has played a major role in nearly every environmental milestone in New York’s history, including the remarkable recovery of the bald eagle, recovery of trout waters from the effects of acid rain, and the largest addition to the Adirondack Park in more than a century, completed in 2016. 

    “For 50 years, New York State has set the national standard for environmental excellence by advancing responsible and proactive policies to protect the planet,” said Basil Seggos, DEC Commissioner. “This year, DEC is reflecting on 50 years of national leadership on the environment and renewing our commitment to tackling the tough challenges the future will bring, particularly climate change, the most pressing threat to our air, land, and water.”  

    Prior to DEC, New York’s Conservation Department was the primary agency responsible for enforcing environmental regulations and protecting the state’s vast natural resources for more than a century. Funding for the Conservation Department came from the Conservation Fund, which raised money primarily through the sale of hunting, fishing and trapping licenses. In 1970, according to a survey of Americans at that time, 70% agreed that air and water pollution were serious problems where they lived (https://www.sciencehistory.org/distillations Policy & Politics, Richard Nixon and the rise of American Environmentalism, written by Meir Rinde, June 2, 2017). In response to growing national support for strengthening environmental protections, Governor Nelson Rockefeller consolidated all environmental programs under the newly created DEC and unveiled it to the public on the first ever Earth Day. The federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was formed later that year in December by President Nixon. 

    “While there is much to celebrate, our work is not done. DEC’s mission to protect public health and New York’s environment is, and will always be, an ongoing endeavor. In the next 50 years, environmental challenges will continue to emerge, and DEC’s steadfast commitment to meet those challenges head on will be stronger than ever before,” said Seggos. “From policies and programs that are effectively reducing waste, greenhouse gas emissions, and the threat of emerging contaminants to investments to revitalize our communities and increase their resiliency, to the Thin Green Line of Environmental Conservation Police Officers and Forest Rangers patrolling and protecting our precious natural resources and public lands, DEC’s more than 3,000 experts are working across the state and around the clock to ensure the health and prosperity of current and future generations of New Yorkers.” 

    As part of DEC’s year-long anniversary celebration, the agency is releasing a commemorative logo that will be used on the DEC website, in printed materials, and other promotions throughout 2020. DEC’s Division of Fish and Wildlife will incorporate the logo in the yearly Habitat Access Pin to commemorate the anniversary. The new Habitat Access Pin will be available at license issuing agents statewide beginning in August. Beginning in January, the agency’s history of significant environmental accomplishments will be memorialized on DEC’s website, via email, social media channels using the #DEC50 hashtag, and in the Conservationist Magazine and Conservationist for Kids. DEC will also host a series of regional and statewide events throughout the year, including launching a new Geocaching Challenge – DEC will designate 50 properties across the state where geocaching canisters will be hidden with information inside on how to receive a prize. 

    For the latest updates on #DEC50 and DEC’s yearling celebration of the agency’s 50th anniversary, visit https://www.dec.ny.gov/about/9677.html. 

DEC Plays Critical Role in Strong Local Economies

Randy Young

If asked, few people would associate the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) with economic development. However, DEC plays a critical role in maintenance and improvement of local strong economies. Indeed, our mission statement says that we protect and enhance the environment in part to protect the “…overall economic and social well-being …” of the people of the state.

    A few examples of DEC directly supporting local economies include our programs to clean up blighted properties with the hopes of redevelopment and returning these properties to the tax rolls.

    DEC’s Brownfield Cleanup Program (BCP) was established to support private-sector cleanups of contaminated properties and reduce development pressure on greenfields.  Tax credits are provided to parties that perform cleanup activities under the BCP to offset the costs associated with site investigation and cleanup, site preparation, and property improvements. Specific examples of sites that have been redeveloped under the BCP include abandoned gas stations, former factory and mill complexes, and foundries.

    DEC also assists with the cleanup of abandoned gas stations and other petroleum spill sites through the New York State Spill Fund. Within DEC Region 6, which includes Jefferson, Lewis, St. Lawrence, Oneida and Herkimer counties, DEC spent approximately $1 million in 2017-2018 to clean up six sites within the city of Rome, and we’re poised to invest an additional $1 million this year on nine sites in St. Lawrence County. 

    Once these cleanups are complete, the municipalities will be able to market the properties for redevelopment and place them back on the tax rolls. 

    Millions of dollars in grants are also awarded to assist local communities with infrastructure improvement assistance. In Jefferson County, the village of Adams was recently awarded a Water Quality Improvement Project (WQIP) grant of $1 million for extensive improvements to its 38-year-old wastewater treatment facility. These improvements to the nearly 40-year-old wastewater treatment facility include the addition of disinfection equipment, which will substantially reduce the number of microorganisms discharged into Sandy Creek.

    “This award supports a much-needed project that the village of Adams has been planned for some time, and the grant will help the village to move it forward,” said David Rarick, DEC Region 6 regional water engineer.

    The WQIP program is a competitive, reimbursement grant program that funds projects that directly address documented water quality impairments. The village of Adams, plus 10 other municipalities and not-for-profits in Region 6 received WQIP awards totaling nearly $4.5 million.

    The town of Theresa was awarded $325,000 to build a new salt storage facility at the town’s highway department, while Thousand Islands Land Trust (TILT) was awarded $555,771 for a land acquisition project for source water protection. TILT plans to place perpetual conservation easements on six parcels of land totaling more than 310 acres of undeveloped habitat and three miles of vegetated shoreline and riparian habitat in the town of Clayton. This project will protect riparian vegetation, natural shoreline, and the surface water quality of the St. Lawrence River.

    The awards were announced mid-December 2018 and affect many statewide communities. Governor Cuomo announced more than $103 million in grants for a statewide total of 124 projects. While all WQIP projects will improve water quality, reduce the potential for harmful algal blooms and protect drinking water statewide, these funds provide an economic benefit, as well. Communities that can improve and expand wastewater collection and treatment capacity are better positioned to accommodate residential and commercial growth opportunities.

    “Access to clean water is critical to the health, safety, and economic wellbeing of our communities. With Governor Cuomo’s leadership, New York is investing millions of dollars to protect and restore invaluable water resources statewide and addressing growing threats like harmful algal blooms,” said DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos.

    In other promising economic news, 12 municipalities in Region 6 received Engineering Planning Grant (EPG) awards totaling about $600,000. This includes $30,000 for the village of Dexter Wastewater Treatment Plant Disinfection Study. The EPG program funds engineering studies that will ultimately lead to wastewater treatment improvement projects that can be funded through the WQIP or other funding opportunities.

Randy Young is the regional attorney and acting regional director. He has been with the DEC for 25 years.