Your PTAC Counselor and Their Services

Amber Stevens

Before taking you on a journey through a typical day as a PTAC counselor, I’d like to preface this with a brief explanation of what “PTAC” stands for, and why, if you’re a business owner, you may want to consider giving your local PTAC office a call.  PTAC, the first of many acronyms you’ll find throughout this article, stands for Procurement Technical Assistance Center.  It is a designation given to over 3oo offices nationwide that provide cost-free assistance to U.S. businesses who participate, or have the potential to participate in the government marketplace.

    Something that is crucial to keep in mind here is that the government buys just about everything!  Are you a small business selling a product or service?  If so, chances are high that some form of government, whether on the federal, state or local level, could potentially have a need to buy what you’re selling some day. They just don’t know it yet.  According to USASpending.gov, a Department of Treasury website that tracks federal spending and contracts, more than $9 billion in federal contracts were awarded to New York state companies or organizations throughout fiscal year 2016 alone.  An additional $1.4 billion were awarded to subcontractors in the same year.  These are significant dollar figures representing a market that simply should not be ignored due to the perceived complexity of doing business with the government.

    With the continual expansion of Fort Drum’s infrastructure over nine years ago, came the apparent need for a regional PTAC in the north country, and with the help of organizations such as New York Business Development Corporation (NYBDC) and Fort Drum Regional Liaison Organization (FDRLO), a PTAC program was established at the Greater Watertown-North Country (GWNC) Chamber of Commerce in Watertown.  North Country PTAC is now one of eight regional centers located in the state, and assists close to 600 clients across 11 of the most northern counties in the state.  Federal funds awarded to firms located within this 11-county territory have reached just over $3 billion year-to-date in  fiscal year 2017 making up for just 3 percent of the $99 billion in federal funds awarded across New York state so far this year.

    All PTAC programs are unique in their own way and ours is no exception, as it is one of few in the country whose host organization is a Chamber of Commerce.  Not only is the GWNC Chamber the largest business association in the north country, but its close proximity to a military installation makes it an ideal host for the North Country PTAC program and a one-stop shop for all your business needs.  It Is important to note that although there are many benefits to becoming a member of your local Chamber of Commerce, there is no membership requirement to receive the free and confidential services provided by the North Country PTAC program.

    A PTAC counselor’s job is to act as a resource to businesses in pursuit of government contracts at federal, state and local government levels.  On any given day, this could mean conducting one-on-one counseling sessions where they are assisting clients with registrations and certifications, determining their company’s readiness to sell to the government, or advising businesses how to go about finding, pursuing and managing government contracts. Clients are also encouraged to sign up for the PTAC’s Bid-Match service, an electronic tool available to all businesses that will help them identify bid opportunities by sending email notifications when the client’s products and/or services match requests for proposals (RFP’s) posted on online bid board sites.

    In addition to one-on-one sessions, North Country PTAC coordinates and provides classes, training seminars and online webinars to provide the critical training and in-depth assistance our local businesses need to compete and succeed in defense and other government contracting.  Throughout 2016 the program sponsored 35 networking and educational events with a focus on a variety of contracting topics including, but not limited to Veteran Owned Business Certifications, MWBE Certifications, new acquisition procedures, specialized solicitations, federal contracting and many more.

    Although assistance is targeted toward small businesses, especially veteran-owned, and woman- and minority-owned enterprises, large businesses can benefit from PTAC services as well by participating in trainings, and with help identifying qualified subcontractors and suppliers.

    Your local PTAC Counselor is not only meeting new people and learning new things every day, but is required to be an expert on all things related to government procurement.  Although it is a challenging role that requires a solid understanding of stringent government standards and complex contract requirements, it’s fulfilling to know that the efforts put forth by the North Country PTAC program do, and will continue to, boost economic activity in the north country by helping local businesses navigate contracting processes.

    North Country PTAC helps create jobs and drive economic benefits in our community.  In 2016 alone, North Country PTAC increased its broad base of capable suppliers and enhanced competition by providing over 500 hours of counseling time, created or retained over 9,000 jobs, and added 92 new clients to its database.  The overall database stands at 591 active clients.

    If you own and operate an established business located in the north country, you are eligible to become a client of North Country PTAC.  To do this, you can go to www.northcountryptac.com, click PTAC SINGUP at the bottom of the page, then complete and submit the online application form. 

                Feel free stop by or call the PTAC office located within the GWNC Chamber of Commerce between 8a.m. and 4:30p.m. Monday through Friday at 1241 Coffeen St., Watertown, NY 13601 or 315-788-4400.

Chamber Gears up for 2017 Farmers Market

Kylie Peck

Mark your calendar on May 24 as the Greater Watertown Farm & Craft Market prepares for its 40th consecutive year. As we are busy securing vendors for this year’s market, it is important to recognize the history and benefits surrounding this annual event.

    Farmer’s markets have been a part of the national landscape since the mid-1700s and have since become woven into our culture, increasing in number and popularity. Year after year these markets continue to be a welcomed event, encouraging healthy shopping selections, social opportunities and increased business visibility.

    A farmer’s market acts as a source of fresh, nutritious foods from local producers. With farm- fresh options, the farmers are adept at providing an abundance of items at reasonable pricing to local consumers. Partnering with nutrition programs can increase the health and wellness of these area residents by offering the Farmers Market Nutrition Program, Farmers Market Wireless EBT Program and Nutrition Education, resulting in fresh options available to everyone.

    There is a growing trend among consumers to support local farmers and local economies. A farmer’s market is a perfect venue for this trend. Bringing these options to the center of our downtown creates a direct connection with the growers of the foods and creates the opportunity for consumers to ask questions, learn about how their food is produced and get to know the people who are providing the food they feed their families. This centers conversation on healthy cooking options and interest in fresh foods.

    Each week the Farm & Craft Market draws thousands of local shoppers and community members to downtown Watertown with a broad mix of diverse cultural backgrounds, a variety of ages and all levels of economic scale.  Throughout the season, local organizations use the market as a venue to educate the public about their mission, publicize their services and highlight opportunities to become involved.

    Hosting a farmers market also helps build the local economy. Not only does this provide an opportunity for farmers, crafters and food vendors to highlight their offerings and skills, it is also a benefit for local businesses. Customers spill into the surrounding area, bringing foot traffic and sales to downtown shops and eateries. Business owners are encouraged to create incentives to draw customers in to generate commerce in the local community.

    Creating an atmosphere with local entertainment, educational opportunities and local food and product sources transforms our downtown into a vibrant public space, which nurtures the sense of community among residents and visitors alike. Adding local shops to the mix creates the ideal opportunity for downtown visitors to make the most of their outing and truly get a sense of what the city of Watertown has to offer.

    With the opening of the market comes excitement and anticipation that summer is truly on its way and we are able to celebrate the offerings of our local farmers and crafters. Year after year we bring 50 to 60 local producers, crafters and food vendors to the community, creating a unique opportunity in Watertown that is met with much anticipation. If you are a farm or craft vendor, please contact our office to learn more about getting involved in our market. We encourage downtown business owners to get in contact with our team to learn more about getting the most out of our downtown market days.

    The Watertown Farm & Craft Market is held every Wednesday between May 24 and October 4 on Washington Street in downtown Watertown. For more information on the market or to learn about the GWNC Chamber of Commerce, please visit our website, watertownny.com or call us at (315) 788-4400.

Kylie peck is the president and CEO of the Greater Watertown-North Country Chamber of Commerce. She lives in Clayton with her husband and two young boys. Contact her at kpeck@watertownny.com or 315-788-4400.

August 2016: Business Scene

History in the Garden, The Walton Homestead, Watertown

The Waltons hosted the Jefferson County Historical Society’s “History in the Garden” event on Saturday, July 9, at their homestead and gardens on Rome State Road, Watertown. The Historical Society presented its annual Awards of Distinction at the event. Photos by Ken Eysaman, NNY Business. [Read more…]

August 2016: People on the Move

New primary care provider at Carthage Family Health Center

Mollura

Mollura

Physician assistant Kelsey Mollura recently joined the Carthage Family Health Center, Carthage, as its latest primary care provider.

Ms. Mollura earned a bachelor’s in biological sciences from Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, and a master’s in physician assistant studies from Arcadia University, Glenside, Pa. She previously worked in an internal medicine/geriatric office in Pittsburgh and in an ENT/sleep medicine office in Greenbelt, Md. [Read more…]

Local Realtor ‘un-franchises’ industry with new business

Jason Smith, right, has opened a new realty North Country Specialists, 24685 St Route 37, Watertown, with co-workers Michael Ablan, left, and Jeff Powell. The team sells commercial and residential real estate throughout the north country. By Amanda Morrison, Watertown Daily Times.

Jason Smith, right, has opened a new realty North Country Specialists, 24685 St Route 37, Watertown, with co-workers Michael Ablan, left, and Jeff Powell. The team sells commercial and residential real estate throughout the north country. By Amanda Morrison, Watertown Daily Times.

Realtor Jason G. Smith will celebrate the grand opening of his new business, Cooperative Real Estate North Country Specialists, 24685 State Route 37, on Sept. 1. [Read more…]

July 2016: Business Scene

Carthage Area Chamber of Commerce Business After Hours at IMEC

The Carthage Area Chamber of Commerce held its June Business After Hours on Wednesday, June 15, at Independent Medical Evaluation Company, Carthage, which marked its 10th anniversary. Photos by Ken Eysaman, NNY Business.  [Read more…]

June 2016: Business Scene

Carthage Area Chamber Citizen of the Year dinner at Carthage Elks Lodge 1762

The Carthage Area Chamber of Commerce hosted the 2015 Citizen of the Year award on May 10 at the Carthage Elks Lodge 1762.


[Read more…]

May 2016: People on the Move

New partners at BCA

BCA Architects & Engineers, Watertown, recently named five new partners: Scott Duell, AIA; Jeffrey McKenna, PE; Travis Overton, AIA; Gregor Smith, PE; and Corey Reid, PE. [Read more…]

May 2016: Business Scene

Carthage Area Chamber of Commerce Business After Hours at Community Bank

Community Bank’s West Carthage branch hosted the April Carthage Area Chamber of Commerce Business After Hours on April 13. [Read more…]

April 2016: Nonprofits Today

Working for north country businesses

Editor’s note: The following information was presented March 3 during the Business of the Year Awards given by the Greater Watertown-North Country Chamber of Commerce. The United Way of Northern New York was named the Small Nonprofit of the Year at the event.

Bob Gorman

Bob Gorman

Every day the Watertown Daily Times prints the names of people charged with driving under the influence. It’s easy to dismiss the names as representing the dregs of society.

But if you are in management around here long enough, one day one of those names will belong to one of your employees, a person who is crucial to the success of your business. [Read more…]