NNY Q&A: Boots Brewing

Co-founder of Boots Brewing Co., Daniel Daugherty at his business in downtown Watertown. Kara Dry/NNY Business

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From the Ashes: Potsdam couple rebuilds family legacy

Audrey and Jake Roberts in the kitchen area of Maple Rock Bed and Breakfast in Potsdam. Christopher Lenney/NNY Business

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Small Business Startup: Tender Touch Massage Therapy

Owner of Tender Touch Massage Therapy, Ashley Mason poses for a portrait at her business in Chaumont. Kara Dry/NNY Business

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How To Prepare For An Uncertain Future

Jennifer McCluskey

Things are slowly, at least in New York state, starting to get back to “normal” or at least semi-functional. However, what I am hearing over and over again from my business clients is, “How do I plan for the future when I don’t know what it will bring?” This is especially a question in communities used to having tourist dollars flowing in every summer. Some businesses are seeing regular customer levels, many are seeing fewer, and some are even seeing more customers than they did before. While it is very difficult to navigate these unclear waters, there are a few tips I can offer that hopefully might help. 

    First off, be careful with your plans. I’m sure you’ve realized this already, but you may have to cut back on business expansion plans you were originally planning for this year unless your business is in one of the few industries that are COVID-resistant. Cut costs where you can. This can be difficult in our area where businesses even before this were struggling, but maybe there is something you can do to decrease your financial burden. Possibly there are areas of waste or lack of profit in your business. 

    Talk to other business owners in your area, both in your industry and in related industries which serve similar customers. We are all in this together, and your fellow business owners may have ideas that you haven’t thought of which will make it easier for both of you to succeed. For example, if you are a retail business in a tourist area, talk to your local hotel owners, B&B owners, and Airbnb’s to find out how their bookings are going for the future to give yourself an idea of how customers may come in. 

    Make it easy for your customers to feel safe shopping in your store. Follow the regulations and rules as they pertain to your business. Make sure your employees are wearing their masks correctly. I have seen several posts going around Facebook of people giving shout outs to businesses who are doing it right, and commenting about ones that are not. If your employees are having difficulties breathing in their masks, possibly look into face shields or one of the newer kinds of masks that are coming out made from better materials. 

    If you haven’t done it yet, get your business online, especially if you have a product to sell. Customers are even less likely than before to shop in person. If you can make it easy for them to order pick up or purchase online, this will make them more likely to shop with you. If you have questions about how to get online or the best way to get your products or services in front of your customers, you can talk to us at the SBDC. 

    Your SBDC business advisor can help, especially if you would like to do budget projections to see different scenarios based on different levels of customers. Or if you just need a listening ear to discuss your own business uncertainty. As always, we are free and confidential, and working as hard as we can to help your business get through this difficult time.  

      You can reach the SUNY Canton SBDC at (315) 386-7312, SUNY Canton SBDC at Clinton Community College at (518) 324-7232, or the Watertown SBDC at JCC (315) 782-9262. 

Small Business Startup: Two Rivers Wood Works

Eric Purcell, owner of Two Rivers Wood Works.

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Planning Ahead For Your Business

Jennifer McCluskey

I am proud of all the work that you and all of our North Country business owners have done to make it through this difficult time. We may have a long road ahead, but you have worked hard to get here and have held on through many challenges. One way to be stronger for the path ahead is to take a good hard look at how your business did during this crisis and find out if there are things that you could do better to prepare for the future. This is a great time to figure out a solid contingency plan for your business, since this disaster may have exposed areas in which your business is weaker. You have a chance now to learn and to figure out policies that will allow you to be better prepared in the future. 

    One big area where businesses struggle significantly is cash flow and being able to set aside a “cushion” of savings. Sometimes businesses expand too fast or buy that bright shiny piece of new equipment maybe before they were ready. This pandemic may have shown you that your cushion might have been too small to deal with a possible emergency. Have you ever played the board game Risk? In the game of Risk, if you expand too fast then on the next turn the other players will wipe out all your armies because you’ll be too weak to defend. You have to expand slowly from a solid base that can be maintained. It’s the same in business: you need to shore up your current business and have enough savings to support yourself before you start trying to expand. 

    I know this is hard for businesses that are constantly living on the edge of solvency. But maybe now is a good time to make a financial plan to figure out how you can get to the point where you do have enough of a cushion to get through a couple of months with little to no income. And if you don’t think it’s possible for your business to ever get to that point, maybe you need to make some radical changes, or possibly maybe it’s time to move on and try something new. Talk to your SBDC counselor. We can help you develop strategies, look through your budget and see where changes can be made, and provide support in whatever way you need. 

    Other areas you might want to consider looking at include:  

  • Develop work from home or contingency location plans. You may have found that having some of your employees work from home went OK for your business. If you likely now have the technology capabilities you need to implement this strategy again in the future if needed.  
  • Assess communication between you and your employees. Now that they are back in the office, find out if there could be ways that you all could communicate better in the future. What systems are you going to put in place so people can get access to critical information and can make critical decisions? Does everyone know his or her role in a crisis?
  • Put key business instructions in writing in an employee manual, or consider training employees to be able to do each other’s jobs. What if a key employee or owner gets sick? Would the business be able to function without that person? Are other people than the business owner authorized to speak to the bank, accountants, and attorneys if needed?

If you need assistance with your business during this difficult time, you can reach out to your local Small Business Development Center office. If we can’t meet with you in person, we can talk on the phone, teleconference, or email, whichever works for you. We are free, confidential, and always available to help. You can reach the SUNY Canton SBDC at (315) 386-7312, SUNY Canton SBDC at Clinton Community College at (518) 324-7232, or the Watertown SBDC at JCC (315) 782-9262. 

Small Business Startup: Creative Styles Pet Grooming

Sydney Schaefer/NNY Business
Kasie Naklick, owner of Creative Styles Pet Grooming.

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Small Business Startup: The Sandwich Bar

Friends and entrepreneurs Jamie Hubbard, left, and Jessica Williams opened The Sandwich Bar in Sackets Harbor together. The shop is located on West Main Street in the village. Sydney Schaefer/NNY Business

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Five Tips For Starting Fresh With Your Business

Jennifer McCluskey

As we start with 2020 it’s a great time to think about how you can freshen up your business to grow and have a greater impact this year. There are a few simple things that you can do to start your business off right:

Tip 1: Take Care of Yourself
Small business owners are some of the hardest working people I know. Long hours, no sick leave, and being the one in charge of all the moving parts can wear on you after a while. Frequently your needs get pushed to the side so that your business can succeed. While this can be necessary, it also means that occasionally you do need to take care of yourself. Take time out for you, whether it’s an actual “unplugged” short vacation (scary, right?), or a weekly yoga class, or even a Saturday hiking in the mountains with your family, do what you need to refresh yourself. You’ll return to your business rested and more able to see the big picture.

Tip 2: Get Organized
Getting organized will help you cut down on wasted time. Have you found yourself looking for a file for over an hour since you didn’t put it in the right folder? (Speaking from experience on that one). Or do you frequently forget tasks? During one of the slower times in your business, it can be a good idea to declutter, get your systems back in place, or try a new time management technique. I’ve found the yearly file cabinet purge and restructuring is really helpful for when business gets too busy later. There are also a lot of apps that can help you get organized. A couple of my favorites are Quickbooks Self-Employed for keeping track of business income, costs, and mileage; Cozi, a free calendar system; and Colornote which allows you to set Post-it note reminders on your phone. Also see what tasks are “time wasters” and see if there are any that you can outsource. Getting a bookkeeper to keep track of the giant box of receipts, or a Virtual Assistant to help with scheduling and returning emails may be more cost-effective than you think if they allow you to spend more time on tasks that create sales.

Tip 3: Improve Your Customer Service
Take a moment to see if there are any things you can do for your customers to improve their experience. For example, do all of your employees greet your customers with a smile? Now might be a good time to check in about that. Ask your customers if there’s anything you can do to improve, either off-line with conversations or comment cards, or online by getting Google or Yelp reviews. If there’s something that you can improve on, they’ll tell you. More reviews also help bring more people to your website. Do you have really great customers who refer a lot of business to you? Maybe get them something special as a thank you.

Tip 4: Get To Know Your Finances
If you feel like you don’t have a good handle on your expenses or know the streams of income that are most important to your business, it might be a good time to get your bookkeeping in order. Whether you keep books by hand, Excel, or use a software program like Quickbooks, it is very important to know your profit margins and overhead expenses. Making sure you do your data entry in a timely manner can save a lot of headaches at tax time and can help you keep a better eye on changes you might need to make in your business. For example, your prices may have to change to match with different costs. Take a look at your numbers and see how you feel about where you are.

Tip 5: Meet With the SBDC!
Would you like to do some of these, but just don’t know where to get started? That’s what we’re here for! The Small Business Development Center offers FREE confidential business counseling, and we can help you with any of the above tasks, and more. Just contact the office closest to you. You can reach the SUNY Canton SBDC at (315) 386-7312, SUNY Canton SBDC at Clinton Community College at (518) 324-7232, or the Watertown SBDC at JCC (315) 782-9262. We’d love to help.

Revolutionize Your Resolution

Jessica Piatt

With the arrival of the New Year you might be inspired by the occasion to set personal resolutions to better yourself. In fact, you might resolve to travel more, learn a new skill, dedicate more time to reading or even working out. But what about your business? 

    If you want to grow your business in 2020, then you should be making New Year’s resolutions for your business, not just yourself. 

    I’m not talking about lofty goals with desired results set haphazardly. I’m talking about real resolutions. While resolutions are often derived from goals, the two are not the same. A goal is the object of one’s ambition, an aim, or desired result, whereas a resolution is a firm decision to do or not to do something. This year ditch the dusty goals you know you’ll abandon by mid-March and instead revolutionize your resolution by committing your company to a decision and taking immediate action. By making resolutions for your organization (and following through with them) you are deciding to better your business. 

    Decisions are made with intent and often with a strategy to deploy them. You should set your resolutions in the same way. They should be both intentional and SMART: specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and timely. 

    When you set your business resolutions for 2020, there are two important statements to keep in mind: your mission and vision statements. Your business’s mission statement defines your organization. It is the reason for its existence; thus, it should be the driving force behind everything your company does. Your business’s vision statement describes where your business aspires to be. It serves as the guide for choosing courses of action. Both your mission and vision statements are vital to the development of your organization and should be considered when making New Year’s resolutions for your business. 

    Maintaining that your resolutions should be SMART and should consider your mission and vision statements, here are a few ideas to get you started on revolutionizing your resolutions in 2020.  

Invest in Your Employees 

    This year resolve to invest in your company’s most valuable asset, your staff. By investing in your employees, you make your staff part of the long-term growth for your organization. Business resolutions with a focus on employees through areas such as communication, training, development and recognition, can have a significant impact on productivity and office culture.   

Inspire Loyalty 

    Now, depending on your business or industry, this category can vary but whether it’s your customers, members, or clients, maintaining healthy relationships with your consumer basis is vital for growth. In 2020, set a resolution with your customers, members, or clients at the center of your decision. Consider improving customer service or enhancing retention rates. Your resolution in this area should focus on inspiring loyalty.  

It Starts with You 

    If you want to incite change in your work world, recognize that it first starts with you. Become an example of the change you want to see in your workspace. Your action will inspire others to do the same. 

Change is kindled by a decision. No matter what you resolve to do in 2020, setting SMART goals will prevent you from giving up on your New Year’s resolution in the first quarter and considering your mission and vision statements will propel your business forward. SMART goals with a foundation of your mission and vision statements will help you to achieve your resolutions for a more prosperous year.