Greetings to the members of the Class of 2017!

Bob Gorman

Those of you who should have been in the Class of 2016 have already learned an important business lesson about this esteemed institution that honors you today: The journey is more important than the destination — as long as your check doesn’t bounce.

    And speaking of business, all of you will be looking for a job soon and there are a couple of things you ought to know. Your perception of the job market and what you think employers are looking for is likely very different from what the job market is and what employers are actually looking for.

    It’s like the difference between a recession and a depression. A recession is when your neighbor loses his job. A depression is when you lose YOUR job. The Rev. Jesse Jackson campaigned for president in the 1980s using this concept. Even though national unemployment was 5 percent at the time, he would tell listeners: “But if YOU are the one without a job, the unemployment rate is 100 percent.”

    Your perception of the job market is affected by the government, which relentlessly tinkers with the economy to create more jobs. Thus, you may be under the impression that everyone is doing his utmost to ensure that everyone has a job.

    And you would be wrong.

    Government says it wants full employment. But business and industry strive for minimum employment because minimum employment is the key to keeping down costs.

    Thus, as you look for a job you should know this: Nobody really wants to hire you.

    This is evidenced by the fact that in most cases, the job you will be applying for has been vacant for some time.

    Business and industry often allow jobs to go unfilled for a while to control expenses and to learn — or be reminded — of just how important the job is to the company. By the time you show up for the interview, the company has only recently — and reluctantly — decided that someone must be hired.

    There are some very sound business reasons for this reluctance.

    1) You are costly. Your salary is all that you see, but the company sees health benefits, insurance, Social Security and a variety of other costs. You think you’re getting paid $30,000, but to the company you are costing it $40,000 or more.

    2) You don’t know anything. You’ll even admit it in a job interview by saying such things as, “I’m a quick learner,” or “you’ll only have to tell me once.” To the company you are a person who won’t generate a return on its investment for at least a year.

    3) You have just spent four years in college being coddled in a manner the rest of the world can’t afford to replicate. There are a lot of chuckleheads who six months out of college quit their jobs and run home to mommy after being wounded by some minor inconvenience. Thus, you are considered a flight-risk hire.

    So if nobody wants you, how do you get a job? The first thing you must do is decide what you want to accomplish in your interview. That means you must learn what the company wants to accomplish.

    Of course, there are several things you shouldn’t do during a job interview. Never ask:

* When do I get a vacation?

* When do I get a raise?

* Will I have to work overtime?

    Never announce which sports teams you hate. Don’t say church is for idiots. If asked about hobbies, don’t meander into your sex life. And don’t get cute and ask what the company is doing to save the Brazilian rain forest, unless the company is actually trying to save rain forests.

    Obviously, what you say will be held against you. In a way, what you are trying to do is have a lively discussion without putting your foot in your mouth.

    Make a list of questions and store them mentally. Learn about the company’s history on its website. They do not have to be great questions, but they will show that you are actually interested in learning about the company. How long does training take place? How many employees are there? Does the company encourage people to be involved in community activities? After all, most businesses and industries want to be good corporate neighbors and want employees who are on the same wavelength.

    Basically, you have few advantages during the interview other than trying to control who is doing the talking.

    Will any of this work? There are no guarantees, of course. Nobody has a sure-fire method for getting a job. But I do know how you can at least be asked to come in for that crucial job interview.

    On your resume, write the following:

SHORT-TERM GOAL

    “To do my job so well that within a year after I’m hired my supervisor will receive a promotion and a pay raise.”

    I know this doesn’t jibe with your notion that the world is about you. But forget the jibe; you need a job. Trust me, this will work.

                Good luck on your future, especially to those of you who added a self-inflicted extra semester or two to your debt load.

August 2016: Nonprofits Today

Embracing the call to ‘Lives Matter’

Bob Gorman

Bob Gorman

In September 1976 my brother, Jim, was shooting baskets with fellow members of the Morgan State University basketball team. It was “open gym” so other students were nearby shooting baskets as well.

No big deal, except for one minor detail: Jim had just shown up on campus as the first white player to receive a basketball scholarship to Baltimore’s “historically black” Morgan State. [Read more…]

April 2016: Nonprofits Today

Working for north country businesses

Editor’s note: The following information was presented March 3 during the Business of the Year Awards given by the Greater Watertown-North Country Chamber of Commerce. The United Way of Northern New York was named the Small Nonprofit of the Year at the event.

Bob Gorman

Bob Gorman

Every day the Watertown Daily Times prints the names of people charged with driving under the influence. It’s easy to dismiss the names as representing the dregs of society.

But if you are in management around here long enough, one day one of those names will belong to one of your employees, a person who is crucial to the success of your business. [Read more…]

April 2016: Guest Essay

Connecting education with business, industry

Tracy Gyoerkoe

Tracy Gyoerkoe

Career and technical educators have been connecting education with business and industry almost since their inception. In today’s world, it’s even more important for these connections to remain strong, and more and more, all educators are working to connect learning to the real world of work. [Read more…]

February 2016: Nonprofits Today

Nonprofits on front lines of heroin war

Bob Gorman

Bob Gorman

In her office at Pivot, Anita Seefried-Brown has created a collage with the faces of bright and promising young adults, all now dead from heroin and other opiate overdoses. One of the photos is of her late son, Herbie. [Read more…]

February 2016: Business Briefcase

MILESTONES

Watertown Chamber names award winners

The Greater Watertown-North Country Chamber of Commerce recently announced recipients of 2015 Business of the Year awards. [Read more…]

October 2015: Business Briefcase

MANUFACTURING

Plant closure delayed

Nirvana Spring Water now intends to close its plant in November, with no layoffs expected until the middle of next month. [Read more…]

July 2015: Nonprofit Toolkit

Commit to making a real difference

Columnist Bob Gorman

Columnist Bob Gorman

Which businesses relentlessly provide financial support to area nonprofits and other local causes? [Read more…]

June 2015: Business Briefcase

TOURISM

Grant funds attraction

National Grid and the Thousand Islands Inn this spring announced a $100,000 Main Street Revitalization Program incentive to offset construction costs associated with the inn’s renovation. [Read more…]

March 2015: Nonprofits Today

Build better communities together

Columnist Rande Richardson

Columnist Rande Richardson

“Everyone is special in their own way. We make each other strong. We’re not the same. We’re different in a good way. Together’s where we belong. We’re all in this together. And it shows when we stand hand in hand, make our dreams come true.”
— Disney’s “High School Musical.”

In 2010, I attended a nonprofit panel discussion. The reporter covering the event began her accounting of the gathering stating, “Organizations alike have various missions, but also the same problems: availability and affordability of services and programs.” In the same article, Watertown Family YMCA executive director Peter Schmitt said “the only way to solve the common problems is for agencies to put aside their differences and work together to come up with solutions, and create effective partnerships. We’ve got to quit being territorial. We can get more done if we work together. Drop the insecurities, let’s get it done” he said.

Amen! [Read more…]