Tough Decisions, Positive Results: Carthage Area Hospital shows profit after years of restructuring and reorganizing strategic plan

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY BUSINESS
Rich Duval CEO at Carthage Area Hospital.

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Changing Cancer Care Options

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY BUSINESS
Construction work continues on the foundation for the new Cancer Treatment Center at Samaritan Medical Center.

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April Small Business Startup: St. Larry’s

JUSTIN SORENSEN / NNY BUSINESS
Laura Cerow stands in her kitchen where she makes organic creams, lotions, and potions.

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NNY Healthy Women: A special supplement to NNY Business

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March Small Business Startup: Hearing Solutions of NNY

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY BUSINESS
Amy DeMar has opened her hearing aid business above the Quik Med on Washington Street in Watertown.

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Study links skills found in military veterans to qualities of successful entrepreneurs

STEPHEN SWOFFORD / WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES Scott J. Tolan, owner of No Remorse CrossFit, Watertown, said that his 21 years in the Army gave him a ‘mission-focused’ mindset.

STEPHEN SWOFFORD / WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES
Scott J. Tolan, owner of No Remorse CrossFit, Watertown, said that his 21 years in the Army gave him a ‘mission-focused’ mindset.

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Joleene Moody

Joleene Moody

Do you love going to work?

I’m going to guess no, because you’re reading this right now. You want out, but you don’t know how to do it. You have bills to pay and mouths to feed. It’s not like you can just give a two-week notice and walk out of hell and into your dream job, right? I mean, who does that?

Thousands of people do that every day.

Droves of unhappy workers trade in their desk and stapler for a shiny new career all the time. We just don’t see it because we’re too busy suffering eight to 10 hours a day at a job we don’t love, compromising ourselves spiritually, financially, and emotionally.

A Gallop poll revealed that 70 percent of U.S. employees are unhappy at work. Seventy percent is a lot of unhappy faces.

When you’re unhappy at work, you start a chain of events that become progressively worse the longer you stay behind the desk. Your life becomes miserable. And the misery doesn’t go away. You wait for it to, but it won’t. Not until you walk out the door.

Here are five things that happen when you stay in a job you don’t love, and the remedy of what to do to rid yourself of the misery
so you can live a genuinely happy life.

Your heart breaks
It’s a thin line between love and hate. When you have to wake up every day and go to a job you don’t love, that line between love and hate grows smaller. You start to question what life is all about. Is this it? Is this all there is; just a commute and a paycheck? This is what I signed up for?

Your relationships suffer
As you question life and your place in it, you become angry. Who do you take your anger out on? The ones you love. You’re not nice. You lash out at those closest to you because they’re standing right there. They take the brunt of your anger, until one by one your loved ones fall away and you find yourself alone.

You become mean and bitter
You’ve seen mean and bitter people out there. They hate the world and everyone in it. Now you’re mean and bitter. You snap at others and become hateful. When you see happy people you secretly plot their demise. It’s a horrible place to be.

You slowly die inside
You’re awake and you’re breathing. You put one foot in front of the other every day, but that doesn’t mean you’re living. Your suffering is causing you so much pain that you’re actually dying inside. Your joy is gone. But instead of taking actions to get out, you take actions that keep you stuck right where you are.

You blame everyone around you for your pain
When you’re stuck in a situation that makes you mean and bitter, you blame others for putting you there. But they didn’t put you there. You put yourself there. You made a series of choices that landed you where you are. If you want out, you have to take responsibility for yourself and take action to get out, bottom line. End of story.


You might be reading this thinking, ‘Working somewhere I hate isn’t ruining my life. That’s ridiculous.’ Perhaps, but here’s the deal: Human psychology says that we need to experience and fill six specific human needs in positive ways in order to feel fulfilled and purposeful. One of those needs is growth. Without growth, we die inside; just like I said. We walk around numb and uncertain. We just exist. Our lives become a circle of frustration. We go to work, come home, pay bills, go back to work, come home, pay more bills … and the cycle continues.

When the weekend comes, we think. “I’m saved!” When Monday comes, we think, “This sucks.” Where’s the joy? If we have to wait for the weekend to experience joy, what kind of life are we really living?

You have a right to love what you do and get paid for it. You don’t have to suffer working a job you don’t love. You tell yourself you do because the bills are piling up and your friends tell you it’s impossible to go after a passion or dream. Everyone else has to work a job they don’t love, so why should you be any different?

They must be right.

You’re scared, too. If you leave your job, you’re ditching your favorite security blanket. Plus there’s that whole, “How am I supposed to support myself and my family if I leave my job to go chase a dream?”

Have faith, baby; just a little faith. If you don’t have a drop of faith, you’ll always be stuck. You’ll always blame others. If you think faith isn’t part of the equation here, stop reading. This isn’t for you. This is only for those who are ready to reclaim their lives.

The remedy

You want out; really and truly? Decide to get out. No more fluctuating back and forth, telling yourself horror stories of what might happen when you quit. No more telling yourself that what you have is “enough” when you know darn well it isn’t.

This isn’t going to be easy. Nothing ever is. But you have a choice right here and now: You can continue to feel the pain of doing what you don’t love, or you can move forward feeling the joy-filled pain of doing something you actually do love.

Either way, it’s going to be uncomfortable. Either way, it’s going to be uncertain. But it’s worth every single awkward twitch and burn. Decide. Only you can put yourself where you truly want to be, no one else.

Be brave. Take the leap. You’ll land on your feet. You always have.

 

http://www.nnybizmag.com/index.php/2016/11/22/11297/

FDRHPO picks Erika Flint as its new executive director

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY Business The Fort Drum Regional Health Planning Organization has picked Erika F. Flint to become its new executive director, the group said on Monday.

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY Business
The Fort Drum Regional Health Planning Organization has picked Erika F. Flint to become its new executive director, the group said on Monday.

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Health: From the voices of vulnerable

Ian Grant WEB

Ian Grant

Are you curious about your blood pressure? There are devices for that and they’re popping up everywhere, even in local grocery stores. Do you need to assess your risk for developing type 2 diabetes? There is a simple test for that here: take-control.org. Want to investigate the burden of chronic disease in our region? There is a website for that — ncnyhealthcompass.org.

In our community, we have unprecedented access to a growing variety of personal health data and community health indicators. But suppose you wanted to investigate patients’ attitudes, behaviors, and experiences with health care? For that you must go directly to the patient, which is exactly what we did.

We called community residents on their cell-phones and landlines, and asked them questions about their personal health, lifestyles and socio-economic status. In the end, we talked to 1,800 men and women of the tri-county region from all age groups, income categories and educational backgrounds. From our group of 1,800 respondents, we found more than 230 individuals who live in very fragile economic conditions. This group spoke on behalf of those of us who live in poverty and are most in need of our support.

Census estimates inform us that the most recent 10-year poverty estimates for each of our three counties — 15 percent of the population in Jefferson; 13 percent in Lewis; 18 percent in St. Lawrence — are the highest they’ve been since the early ‘60s and ‘70s. This vulnerable and growing population typically suffers a disproportionate burden of poor health outcomes, low access to health care and insufficient social supports. To alleviate these burdens and develop an equitable health care system, we need a greater understanding of the scope of social and economic factors impacting their health.

Our 2016 Community Health Survey allowed us to explore these social and economic health determinants while confirming the county-level estimates of individuals impacted by poverty. The survey revealed that individuals with limited resources are 67 percent more likely to visit an emergency department and have a 27 percent higher rate of hospitalization than the general population.

Though there are numerous potential explanations for these higher emergency department visits and hospitalizations, the survey data established that these individuals are sicker than the general population. In fact, more than half of Medicaid enrollees reported a diagnosis of at least one of the following chronic conditions: diabetes, prediabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or obesity — while just 38 percent of non-Medicaid enrollees report having one of these illnesses.

In addition to battling the challenges of finding the appropriate level of health care, 43 percent of Medicaid enrollees expressed that they do not always understand the instructions they receive during a clinical appointment. Significantly fewer non-Medicaid enrollees — 31 percent — expressed similar challenges. Health literacy, or the ability to obtain, process, and understand health information to make informed health decisions, affects all economic classes but disproportionately affects impoverished members of our community. Low health literacy is associated with increased risk of mortality, poor overall health and lower rates of preventive screening and immunizations.

Arguably the most startling statistic from the survey indicates that only 29 percent of Medicaid enrollees have five or more close friendships, while 41 percent of non-enrollees enjoy the benefit of large social networks. In other words, more than 70 percent of the individuals living in poverty within our community do so while experiencing low levels of social engagement and isolation. Notably, high levels of positive social engagement are associated with improved physical health and mental well-being.

Documenting the voices of the vulnerable is only half of the battle. Our extensive network of partners — including community coalitions, local health departments, community health centers, hospitals and social services agencies — will leverage these findings to tackle these challenges. These stories will continue to motivate action by all sectors of our community. The data underscore our duty to support our vulnerable brothers and sisters.

To learn more about poverty and health in our community and how you can take control of your own health visit the North Country Health Compass at www.ncnyhealthcompass.org.


-Ian Grant is the population health program manager for Fort Drum Regional Health Planning Organization, Watertown. Contact him at igrant@fdrhpo.org or 755-2020. Visit fdrhpo.org to learn more. A column from Fort Drum Regional Health Planning Organization staff appears every other month in NNY Business.

Working to make others well

River women aim to help Clayton become ‘healthiest town in America’

Lori Wilson Arnot, owner of River Wellness Center and Lori's Herbs and Oils, hopes to make Clayton the healthiest town in America. Photo by Justin Sorensen/NNY Business.

By nature, Lori Wilson Arnot is an ambassador.

A Rochester-area native, Ms. Arnot has ingrained herself in the river community during the past decade, heading up initiatives behind the Zenda Community Garden, Clayton Food Co-Op and founding her own pair of businesses, River Wellness Center and Lori’s Herbs and Oils.

What’s unique about Ms. Arnot is not that she’s a one-woman show; she has the indelible ability to move others to become outstanding members of their community by encouraging them to explore and to learn. [Read more…]

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