Leadercast Live Comes to NNY in 2020

Kristen Aucter

For anyone who had not heard, on May 3rd, Lewis County Chamber of Commerce, Lewis County Economic Development and The Human Factor hosted Leadercast Live at the Tug Hill Vineyards. Leadercast Live is the largest, single-day leadership event in the world and we were able to be a part of it as the only location in New York state outside of New York City. The various speakers provided unique insight on their take of leadership. Many of the participants stated that they took away more from this day than what they had expected to, myself included. The theme of “Building Healthy Teams” was intriguing to many people and hinted at more than just how to lead a team and we were not let down. 

    Dr. Caroline Leaf was one of the speakers for the day. A cognitive neuroscientist with a PhD in communication pathology specializing in neuropsychology, Dr. Leaf spoke on the importance of mindset and explained “you can’t always control what happens to you, you can always control how you react.” Something that most of us have heard, but while in the midst of day-to-day activities seem to forget. Her suggestions, when finding yourself falling into a negative mindset, were to take a few moments to re-evaluate, focus on the positive aspects of your life, and identify the accomplishments that you have made so far. According to her, the ability to self-regulate your thoughts can have long-lasting impacts including increasing your overall creativity, efficiency, and productivity. If you breed negativity that will be all you show to the world. Challenge yourself to instead choose happiness so you can be a beacon of light to those around you. 

    Another speaker, Carla Harris, has led an extremely successful career on Wall Street and currently serves as vice chairman, managing director, and senior advisor at Morgan Stanley as well as being a talented gospel singer. In my opinion, her focus on leadership being intentional really stood out. We all know, more or less, that leadership is something that needs to continuously be fed, both in ourselves and in our teams. Being a great leader is not necessarily about being a great manager or director, but how you encourage and inspire others to be their best. It was very inline with another speaker Patrick Lencioni, “Humility isn’t thinking less of yourself, but thinking of yourself less.” 

    It is hard to summarize a full day of inspiration and motivation into a short article. The intention of Leadercast is to develop leaders that are worth following and the Lewis County Chamber of Commerce, Lewis County Economic Development and The Human Factor are excited to announce we will be hosting Leadercast Live 2020 on May 7, 2020. The benefits of improving leadership skills within our teams, within our businesses and within our community cannot be stressed enough and we are committed to providing this opportunity to our region. If you are interested in being updated on Leadercast 2020 please feel free to email me at kristen@lewiscountychamber.org to be put on our mailing list. 

Young Leaders Provide Glimpse Into Our Community’s Future

Rande Richardson

“It wasn’t until I got into Youth Philanthropy Council that I saw the community is as a whole and what the needs are. It opened my eyes not only in Jefferson County and Watertown, but to Lewis County and St. Lawrence County. I think it taught me great life skills and the lessons that I’ve learned will be with me for a long time to come. Those values that YPC has instilled in me will carry on.” — Marcus Lavarnway, Youth Philanthropy Council alumnus 


Studies show that involvement as a youth is a significant factor influencing how adult volunteers and donors behave. This follows an approach of moving away from viewing youths as problems to be solved to seeing young people as resources to engage in community development. In this way, they can contribute more meaningfully to their own growth as leaders and to society in general. Students benefit from exploring community issues, the work of the region’s nonprofit organizations, and opportunities available for volunteering. They gain knowledge that is not as easily offered in the traditional school setting. This includes interpersonal problem solving, consensus building, diplomacy, confident, productive and respectful disagreement and higher-level communication and networking skills. 

    The Youth Philanthropy Council (YPC) became a pilot project of the Community Foundation in 2010. In nine years, high school students have been entrusted with grantmaking resources and empowered with the responsibility of properly stewarding gifts from generous annual donors combined with matching gifts from major sponsors Watertown Savings Bank and the Renzi Foodservice Charitable Foundation. Their work also led to engagement of middle school students through the Community Spirit Youth Giving Challenge. The results are proving the wisdom of asking our youth for their input. 

    Former YPC members recently reflected upon their experiences as they related to their time in college and as they advance their careers and personal lives. Each alumnus cited YPC as their most transformative high school experience. Others said the program helped them “find their place” in the community and become connected with adults and organizations in meaningful ways. They all agreed that it caused them to seek out opportunities to serve. They now see community service as a fundamental part of a fulfilling life. (To hear their full comments, visit www.nnycpodcast.com). 

    This year’s YPC is preparing to make its $20,000 in grant recommendations. Nonprofit organizations should take note of some emerging trends of this generation:  

  • They take very seriously the responsibility of being entrusted with other people’s money.  
  • They prefer to provide support for the heart of a program, project or initiative. 
  • They are not inclined to offer help unless they are confident in the organization’s ability to do what they say they will do. They expect accountability and good stewardship. 
  • They don’t allow geographic “boundaries” to get in the way of supporting something worthwhile.
  • Despite “youth” in its name, YPC members see their mission and responsibility as transcending programs that exclusively benefit young people. 
  • They understand the balance between supporting basic human needs with enriching the quality of life. 
  • They demonstrate an ability to remain assertive while respecting, valuing and appreciating opposing points of view.
  • They do not want to be underestimated or marginalized.

Youth philanthropy is, at the broadest level, passionate involvement of young adults giving of their time, talent and treasure in support of the common good, just as philanthropy is itself. The added ingredient we can all provide is the energy, excitement and spark that will continue to nurture the types of communities where all of our lives will be enriched. This helps us all to better answer the question: “What do I care about?” 

    More importantly, we affirm that we must have a desire, commitment and will to integrate caring more deliberately into our daily lives. There should be no doubt that we all benefit from a community and a world where authentic caring, respect and stewardship is valued, expected, affirmed, and non-negotiable. By learning from each other, we help ensure that the leadership of the past is linked to the leadership of the future. 

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